University Libraries Staff Honored for Longevity and Service

Three long-time University Libraries staff members were honored recently with the Staff Service Recognition Award for their long history of employment and service at UofL. At a reception on July 19, President Lori Gonzalez and Brian Buford, Head of the Employee Success Center, presented awards to Kathy Moore, Circulation Manager at the Bridwell Art Library (45 years); Andy Clark, Ekstrom Library Facilities Coordinator (15 years); and Anthony Iles, Technology Specialist with Kornhauser Health Sciences Library (15 years).

Image of two women, both with blonde hair standing before large circular University of Louisville insignia.
UofL President Lori Gonzales and Kathy Moore, Libraries Circulation Manager at Bridwell Art Library.

Kathy Moore began her career with the Art Library in 1975 as an undergraduate at UofL, working as a student assistant while earning her Bachelor of Science in Biology major. When a staff position opened with the Art Library, she jumped at it and never looked back. She remembers using the card catalog and “our oh-so-futuristic IBM Selectric II Correcting typewriter with changeable font balls.”

As one of only three staff employees who have worked for 45 years honored at the event, Moore was invited to speak to all attendees.

A 1988 UofL alum, Andy Clark worked with UPS before coming to Ekstrom Library as a Facilities Coordinator in 2007. Clark said Ekstrom was his favorite place on campus during this student days, but thought the building – built in 1981 – seemed old and dated. He has been glad to see the improvements and renovations in the library over the past 15 years.

Anthony Iles has worked as a Technology Specialist at Kornhauser for two years, formerly working as an Inter Library Loan Assistant, Library Assistant and Clinical Research Assistant. Prior to joining Kornhauser, he briefly worked for Humana Corporation.

Kornhauser Library “provides a unique service to the medical community,” Iles said, “whether face to face and/or virtual, which allows us to help those doing research get information they need.  The reason I have stayed at Kornhauser Library is because I enjoy the work that I do and the people I work with. We are a great ‘work family.’”

The reception was hosted by the Employee Success Center to honor all employees who have worked at least 10 years for UofL.


Archives & Special Collections celebrates Julius Friedman with Exhibit and Gallery Dedication

Early posters and other works by internationally renowned Louisville artist Julius Friedman are featured in the exhibit Graphic Pioneer: The Early Poster Designs of Julius Friedman, 1965-1980, hosted by Photographic Archives, part of UofL’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC). The exhibit opened with a reception on July 14 featuring the dedication and renaming of the Photographic Archives gallery in Friedman’s honor.

Image of man cut in half and duplicated in reverse beneath layers of yellow graduating to orange in the shape of butterfly wings. A graphic design of Friedman's.
The exhibit announcement features a 1973 graphic work by Friedman promoting the Center for Photographic Studies.

Friedman’s sister, Carol Abrams, donated the bulk of his artistic works to the Photographic Archives after his passing in 2017. Ms. Abrams states, “Julius loved to mentor students and fellow artists. In giving his work to the Archives and Special Collections, students can learn from his work.” Ms. Abrams also generously provided support to renovate the gallery, enhance storage for ASC’s photographic holdings, including Friedman’s work, and prepare the collection for research by the community. This preparatory work is ongoing, but the full collection is expected to be open to the public in 2023.

Shown are five people, four women and one man, holding a large pair of scissors and surrounded by balloons.
ASC Director Carrie Daniels, Libraries Dean Bob Fox, Carol Friedman Abrams, Archivist Elizabeth Reilly and UofL President Lori Gonzalez cut the ribbon to open the newly named Julius Friedman Gallery.

Beloved by the local arts community, Friedman was also highly regarded among international audiences. Perhaps best known for the posters “Fresh Paint” and “Toe on Egg,” Friedman created posters and other graphic works for a broad range of clients. Outside of his design work, Friedman created his own artwork through photography – often printing on unique surfaces like metals and fabrics – as well as sculpture, furniture design, collage, book art, and collaborative video.  While this exhibit focuses on his early posters, the collection includes this broad range of media and formats.

“Julius Friedman was such a significant figure in our local arts scene,” said Carrie Daniels, Director of ASC. “We are delighted to serve as the home of his archive, and to present a slice of it to the community in this exhibition.”

“Fresh Paint” is one of Friedman’s most recognized posters. 1978. By Julius Friedman and Nathan Felde.

Friedman was a graphic design alumnus of UofL and had a decades-long relationship with the University Libraries. His work frequently appeared in ASC exhibits, including a 2012 celebration of Photographic Archives’ 50th Anniversary, which featured Friedman’s photographic capture of a ballerina in mid-swirl. Friedman’s close friend, former Art Library Director Gail Gilbert, inspired one of Friedman’s later efforts, a project titled The Book.  Gilbert suggested that Friedman create works of art from old books that otherwise would have been thrown away, and he ran with the project, taking old books, tearing them, twisting them, boring into them, reconstituting them and creating art. The Book consists of 130 photographs of that art.

Promotional poster for D.W. Griffith Film Series showing graphic design of gray transparent photographs of a man's, film director Francois Truffaut's face duplicated in horizontal rows. In the middle is a row of yellow photographs showing the man's full face at the top and just the lower half of his face in duplicate below.
Truffaut poster, one of a group of posters for the D.W. Griffith Film Series. 1976. By Julius Friedman and Nathan Felde.

Among ASC’s Oral History Center (ohc.library.louisville.edu) digital offerings are two recordings of conversations between Abrams and ASC archivist and local historian Tom Owen. In them, Abrams discusses her memories of growing up with Julius, her older brother and only sibling, and how she came to work alongside him in his studio and then gallery to exhibit and sell his work commercially. Abrams recounts observing her brother’s talent burgeoning in childhood and watching him become successful as an adult. She also talks about establishing a nonprofit foundation in her brother’s name to help young people pursue academic degrees in the arts, the Julius Friedman Foundation (juliusfriedman.org).

The exhibition will run through December 16 in the Julius Friedman Gallery, on the lower level of Ekstrom Library. For more information, contact Elizabeth Reilly (502 852-8730; elizabeth.reilly@louisville.edu).


Marcia Hite Exhibit Showcases Patron and Artist

By Trish Blair

Have you ever thought about the names of the buildings and spaces while you were walking around downtown, your own neighborhood, or even the University of Louisville? The names of buildings, streets, and organizations are usually derived from either a person, place, or thing. The Hite Institute for Art and Design is named for Allen Rose Hite (1865-1941) whose generous bequest of nearly $1,000,000, 75 years ago elevated the Art department to a nationally known art program. But why did a businessman and attorney (UofL 1885) grant such a substantial sum of money to creating a space for students to learn the visual arts? Because his wife, Marcia S. Hite, was an artist and convinced him that the arts and art education was a valuable gift to the people of Louisville. 

“Bumble and Lily,” one of Hite’s works on display at the Bridwell Art Library.

Marcia Shallcross Warren (1877-1946) was born in Louisville to a prominent family of steamboat captains and society dames.  She entered a world of debutantes, formal dances, and ladies who lunch. After her debut, she met Allen R. Hite and they were married in 1897. They settled in a grand house on Third Street and began their life of civic duty and patronage. When the first World War broke out in Europe, Allen was too old for conscription, so he and Marcia volunteered at Camp Taylor. Marcia became a local hero by de-facto leading the Red Cross mission at Camp Taylor, raising $250,000 ($4.6 million in 2022 dollars) in 1918, for the Red Cross.

As part of the 75th anniversary of the Hite Institute of Art and Design, the Art Library will host an exhibit honoring Marcia Shallcross Hite, who along with her husband Allen R. Hite, made the bequest that funded the creation of the Hite Institute. During her lifetime, Hite exhibited her watercolors in New York and Boston alongside artists such as Edward Hopper and John Carroll.  The exhibit is based on artifacts from the Allen R. and Marcia S. Hite papers in the Art Library’s manuscript collection and features some of Marcia Hite’s original works from the University of Louisville art collection. The exhibit will be on display throughout 2022.

When the war was over and they re-settled into married life, Marcia began taking art classes at the newly formed Louisville Handicraft Guild. She became president of that group’s next incarnation, the Louisville Art Center. During this time, Marcia discovered that she could paint and draw despite no formal training. In 1930, after painting watercolors for two years, she began exhibiting in New York and Boston, along such artists as Edward Hopper, as well as in Louisville. She became known as ‘Louisville’s Memory Painter.’

In 1941, she became a widow when her beloved husband Allen died at the age of seventy-six. However, before his death Marcia, had transformed Allen into an art lover and a philanthropist. When Allen wrote his first will, he made a codicil that they would bequest the bulk of their estate to the University of Louisville to create an art institute. In 1946, after Marcia passed, the Allen R. Hite Institute of Art was founded.  At the time their gift was the largest in UofL history.

While the name has evolved over the last 75 years, the mission is still as they envisioned:

“For the furtherance of Modern art in general and education by teaching, lecture and scholarship.” 

Without Marcia Shallcross Warren Hite the visual arts would be very different at UofL today.


Awards Honor University Libraries Employees

Three University Libraries employees have been honored with awards for outstanding performance and merit, and for contributions to the Louisville community.

John Burton, Acquisitions Specialist with Technical Services won the University of Louisville’s annual Outstanding Performance Award honoring exceptional service in staff.  Burton has worked for the Libraries for over 30 years, having begun as a libraries student assistant, and later with Technical Services, and has experienced first-hand the transformation of the library profession and its services, including the transition from an analog card catalog to digitized online collections. As Acquisitions Specialist, Burton is in charge of finding and evaluating items to add to the Libraries’ physical and digital collections.

Photo of John Burton
John Burton

The award comes with a cash award of $1,000, an acrylic plaque, and public mention on the University website and UofL Today.

Fannie Cox, Outreach and Reference Librarian, has been chosen for the University of Louisville Distinguished Faculty Award, which recognizes “the excellent service of the University of Louisville faculty and the significant impact that service has on the university and beyond.” The awards are given annually to faculty for exceptional service in five categories: service to UofL; service to the profession; service to the community, the commonwealth and/or the region; national/international service; career of service.

Picture of Fannie Cox with award.
Fannie Cox (photo by Rob Detmering)

As community outreach and reference librarian, Cox has forged relationships with numerous organizations and individuals working to help under-served communities in Louisville, particularly in the West End. She leads the Outreach Program within the Libraries, which offers instructional support to community members, helping them develop informational literacy and critical thinking skills. She has been with the Libraries for 22 years.

Cox and Burton were honored at the 2022 Faculty and Staff Excellence Awards Reception on Monday, April 18 in the Student Activities Center ballroom.

Additionally, Weiling Liu, Head of Office of Libraries Technology, was one of five individuals selected to receive the Jewish Family and Career ServicesMOSAIC (Multicultural Opportunities for Success and Achievement In our Community) Award.  The MOSAIC Awards “honor immigrants and refugees from around the globe who have made significant contributions in their professions to the Louisville community.” The 2022 nominations were open to individuals who, “regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, or country of origin, have fulfilled their dreams of self-sufficiency and made an impact in our community” according to Liu’s award letter.

Photo of Weiling Liu
Weiling Liu

Liu has worked with the Libraries for 23 years. As the Head of OLT, she manages and directs a department responsible for all aspects of library technology systems and libraries technical support. In her history with the University Libraries, she oversaw the migration of the library catalog system and the implementation of Ekstrom Library’s noted Robot Retrieval System. She has been a member of state, national and international library professional associations.  In addition, she is a life member of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), a non-profit international organization of librarians. Professor Liu also serves on the Association of Chinese Americans in Kentuckiana (ACAK) board and was president from 2018-2021.

The MOSAIC award ceremony and dinner will take place on Thursday, May 26, 2022 at the Muhammad Ali Center in downtown Louisville. In addition to Liu, this year’s award winners are Dr. Faten Abdullah, Jose Neil Donis, Dr. Juan Gustavo Polo, and Frank Schwartz.


Louisville history of racial oppression and activism revealed in new online resource

By Rebecca Pattillo

University of Louisville’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC) has published a new resource, Uncovering Racial Logics: Louisville’s History of Racial Oppression and Activism, a website that provides access to documents, oral histories, photographs and other materials that tell the story of Louisville’s history of racial oppression and activism.

The site is focused on education, policing and housing, “areas in which we see institutional racism at work, producing unequal access to resources, freedoms, and opportunities as part of ongoing U.S. racial stratification,” according to the site’s introduction. Funded by the Cooperative Consortium for Transdisciplinary Social Justice Research (CCTSJR) and the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, the collaborative project was created by faculty members across multiple departments for an interdisciplinary look at the “racial logics” of Louisville via primary source materials housed in ASC.

A group of Black and white women standing in front of a bus, 21 July 1966. Source: R_18909, Royal Photo Company Collection, 1982.03, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
A group of Black and white women standing in front of a bus, 21 July 1966. Source: R_18909, Royal Photo Company Collection, 1982.03, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

Dr. Carrie Mott, UofL Assistant Professor of Geographic and Environmental Sciences and one of the site’s creators, said the goal of the project was to provide access to useful information to anyone interested in learning about Louisville’s history around racial justice.

“We also wanted to provide a tool that would help people see the amazing archival resources housed at ASC,” said Mott.  “From prior research and teaching with archives at UofL, I knew of the wealth of resources we have here at UofL. But we recognized many people on campus as well as in the larger Louisville community do not understand how to use archival resources, why they might be useful, or know how to access them. The website was an opportunity to provide some resources in terms of actual scanned documents, but also to help people learn that UofL has a lot more where that came from for research on Louisville’s racial history.”

Rebecca Pattillo, ASC Metadata Librarian and site co-creator, said “Working on this project allowed ASC to make some of our materials available digitally. The site also directs visitors to our robust online digital collections, where they can explore some of the materials referenced in greater depth.”

“One misconception about the archives is that they are only available to UofL affiliated people, when actually we are open to anyone in the community,” said Pattillo.

The site features scanned archival documents including pamphlets, newspaper clippings, oral histories, correspondence, and photographs, with contextual and historical information about each document and the larger collection to which it belongs. In addition to scanned documents, the site also highlights oral histories, story maps, and other resources addressing Louisville’s racial history. 

"Office of Black Affairs bulletin 1969-1970", Reference file: Office of Black Affairs, Archives and Special Collections
“Office of Black Affairs bulletin 1969-1970,” Reference file: Office of Black Affairs, Archives and Special Collections

Site users may explore the topic of both secondary and higher education in Louisville to learn about the push for equal pay among Black and white teachers in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the city’s move to desegregate schools via court-ordered busing in the mid-1970s, integration of the University of Louisville in the 1950s, and the founding of the Black Student Union and the Department of Black Affairs in the late 1960s. In addition, learn about Simmons University, one of Kentucky’s two HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), and Louisville Municipal College, the only Black liberal arts college in the state which operated from 1931 through 1951, when it merged with a newly integrated UofL.

Another topic explored is the history of policing and police violence throughout the city. An example is the story of Fred J. Harris, a Black man who lost an eye after being beaten by police in 1979, and the work of the Kentucky Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression to seek justice for Harris by demanding accountability from the police force.

Progress in Education (PIE) Records, (Box 3, Folder 3 "Statewide March on Frankfort, July 2, 1976"), 
Archives and Special Collections, University of Louisville.
Progress in Education (PIE) Records, (Box 3, Folder 3 “Statewide March on Frankfort, July 2, 1976”), Archives and Special Collections, University of Louisville.

Housing and Urban Renewal is another focus of the Uncovering Racial Logics project. Select archival materials highlight the narrative of Louisville’s history of racist housing policies and practices, including the construction of racially segregated federal public housing projects in the aftermath of the destruction of neighborhoods and displacement of communities via Urban Renewal. These materials also reveal resistance to and organizing among the Black community and white allies to fight against racist housing policies and discriminatory practices. One such well known housing project is Beecher Terrace, which is explored via the papers of its long-time manager, Earl Pruitt.

Rounding out the project is an extensive, albeit not exhaustive, list of resources for further research. You can explore interactive maps that detail the history of racism within city planning and zoning, as well as redlining within Louisville. In addition is a list of community resources that highlight local organizations that work to empower and improve life for Louisville’s diverse citizens. Also included is a list of UofL Resourcesthathighlights on-campus organizations and committees that work towards racial and social justice, as well as minority affinity groups.

This project was created by Carrie Mott, Rebecca Pattillo, Melanie Gast, Anna Browne Rebiero, Joy Hart, Kelly Kinahan, and Catherine Fosl, with additional assistance from undergraduate and graduate research assistants Cat Alexander, Elizabeth Frazier, and Ben Harlan. Additional technical assistance was provided by Cassidy Meurer and Terri Holtze. Special thanks goes to UofL’s Cooperative Consortium for Transdisciplinary Social Justice Research (CCTSJR) and Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research (ABI) for funding and supporting this work, as well as our community partners.

Archives and Special Collections collects, organizes, preserves, and makes available for research rare and unique primary and secondary source material, particularly relating to the history and cultural heritage of Louisville, Kentucky and the surrounding region, as well as serving as the official memory of the University of Louisville.


How to reserve a room in our libraries

Curious about how to reserve a room in one of our libraries? It’s easy!

First, navigate to the University Libraries website: library.louisville.edu/home.

Libraries website home page. In the right-hand column is the box titled Reserve a Room.

Next, click on the orange “Reserve a Room” box in the right hand column. This page should come up:

Landing page for room reservations. Shows room descriptions and a limit to box.

Then choose the library where you would like to reserve a room. Or if you prefer, you can limit your choices by room type: auditoriums, conference rooms, group study rooms, or instruction labs.

Small box with inverted white text on black backdrop titled "Limit To"

Some rooms are only available to be reserved by faculty or staff. Others are also open to students.

Descriptions of rooms may include a list of equipment and technology available within the space. For example, Art Library’s Room 102C includes:

  • Movable furniture
  • Control panel to turn on/off system
  • 70″ mounted television monitor
  • Mac computer 
  • Web conferencing camera
  • CD/DVD player
  • Screen mirroring software compatible with laptops, phones, and tablets
  • Wireless keyboard and mouse
  • Freestanding podium
  • External speakers
  • Mobile whiteboard and markers
Shows image of Art Library's Room 102C, which may be reserved. Gray carpet, six tables with two chairs each, all modular, and a large video screen. Art on the walls.
The Art Library’s Room 102C

Please remember to visit each library’s policies (Ekstrom; Kornhauser; Art; Music). Some rooms have specific policies which are included in the room description.


In Memoriam: Photographer Ron Morris (1947-2021)

By Trish Blair, Art Library Collections Coordinator

In the fall of 2018, I met Ron Morris for the first time, and the very first thing he said to me and my co-worker Kathy Moore, is that he was dying. And that is how our partnership began – with that brutally honest and poignant statement.

Photo of woman with dark hair standing before a barn door. Part of Morris' portraits.
Woman standing in front of a barn. Part of Morris’ “Portraits” series.

He asked if the Art Library would be interested in a donation of maybe 200 of his books about photography.  Since we were between directors, we consulted with Libraries Dean Fox, Tyler Goldberg (Head of Technical Services), Matt Wyatt (Development Director), and James Procell (Interim head, Art Library), and decided to accept, as photography is one of our most popular collections.  After meeting with Mr. Morris, that quickly turned into a donation of over 1,100 titles.  We don’t have an official value, but a rough estimate is about $175,000. We think it was the largest single donation to the Bridwell Art Library.

Image of two birds in a cage on a table set for two in front of a Paris cafe.
Two birds on a table in front of a Paris cafe.

I began working with Mr. Morris, taking his hand-written lists of books and arranging for pick-ups. In the summer of 2019, I took our student intern at the time, Maree Grosser, with me for the heavy lifting.  Once a week we would drive to Mr. Morris’ house and fill either my car or the library van with the treasures he was gifting to us.  He would always have jazz or classical music playing and was happy to find out that Maree was an aspiring photographer. His keen intellect and interest in both our lives was comforting. He and I shared a love of taking pictures of things that were not “pretty” to museum standards. 

To say that he was eclectic is an understatement. He was unconventional, funny, and warm.  He collected antique typewriters, cameras, and books of all sorts. He had a very large collection of Chuck Taylor shoes that perfectly suited his style and being. His apartment was like a museum, mixed with a bookstore, mixed with a comfy home.

Woman with bare shoulders sitting on a couch.
From Morris’ “Portraits.”

Ron Morris was a Louisville native and alumni of UofL’s Hite Art Institute (1969). He was also the Arts editor at the Louisville Cardinal during his undergrad period. He went from UofL to the Massachusetts College of Art for his MFA (1982) and settled in Boston for 40 years teaching photography at Newtown High School and honing his craft.  He retired from teaching in 2014 and moved back to Louisville.  His photographs have been exhibited at the Addison Gallery of American Art, Hofstra University, MIT, the Portland Art Museum, Newton Art Center, Vision Gallery, Rhode Island School of Design, the New England School of Photography, the Memphis Academy of Art, the Hudson River Museum, Northeastern University and Texas A&M University, and the Caviar Forge & Gallery in Louisville.

We had great plans to celebrate his donation in 2020, but Covid cancelled them.  Unfortunately for us, Mr. Morris passed away in the spring of 2021. Through his death we have added more items to our collection from his estate: prints of his photography; self-made books; graphic design images of the objects he collected; re-imagined movie posters; and of course more books. We will celebrate his gift sometime in the near future, but until then we will keep adding the objects he gave to us and remembering the man who was so inspirational.


Libraries Dean Fox Named Treasurer of ARL

University of Louisville Libraries Dean Bob Fox has been elected treasurer for the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). He will serve a three-year term, and will chair the group’s finance committee.

Dean Fox became UofL’s member representative to ARL in 2011 and joined the ARL Board and its finance committee in 2018; he has been a member of the audit committee since its founding in 2019. He had served as interim treasurer since August.

Fox has served as Dean of the University Libraries since 2011. Since that time, and prior to his tenure with UofL, he has served in a number of leadership positions with professional and industry organizations.

Image of Libraries Dean Bob Fox standing in front of cardinal bird graphic on the third floor of Ekstrom Library.

In addition to his ARL board service, Fox has served on several ARL committees and working groups since he became a member representative in 2011, including the Statistics and Assessment Committee/Research and Analytics Committee (2012, chair 2013–2016); the Libraries That Learn Design Team (2015–2016); and the ARL Academy Advisory Committee (2018–2019). Fox was an ARL Leadership Fellow in 2009–2010. 

UofL Libraries became members of ARL in 2002.

About the Association of Research Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 125 research libraries in Canada and the US whose mission is to advance research, learning, and scholarly communication. The Association fosters the open exchange of ideas and expertise; advances diversity, equity, and inclusion; and pursues advocacy and public policy efforts that reflect the values of the library, scholarly, and higher education communities. ARL forges partnerships and catalyzes the collective efforts of research libraries to enable knowledge creation and to achieve enduring and barrier-free access to information. ARL is on the web at ARL.org.


ThinkIR Highlights BIPOC Scholarship

Part of Open Access involves building structural equity in OA venues. To this end, the Libraries have created The Collective, an initiative to uplift BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) faculty and staff at UofL by highlighting their research and providing open-access to BIPOC-produced scholarship on ThinkIR, the University’s digital institutional repository. 

From Undergraduate Teaching Faculty: The HERI Faculty Survey 2016–2017 (www.heri.ucla.edu) © 2019

Hosted and managed by the University Libraries, ThinkIR promotes genuine open access and sustainable scholarship by making the work of UofL researchers freely available to a global audience without requiring costly and unsustainable access to journal subscriptions. “The Collective” was initiated in response to research showing that faculty who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or people of color are underrepresented and marginalized in academia. According to the Higher Education Research Institute’s 2016-2017 faculty survey, there were large gaps between white and BIPOC scholars  feeling a need to work harder to be perceived as a legitimate scholar. “Substantially more Black (72.2%), Asian (70.7%), Latino/a (70.6%), and Native American (66.7%) faculty perceived a need to work harder than their peers to gain legitimacy compared to just 46.8% of White faculty who felt similarly.”

By featuring a BIPOC scholars research collection in our institutional repository, we hope to encourage scholars of all disciplines to intentionally seek out the research and scholarship of their colleagues of color.

Helpful Links and Resources

Home – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville 

BIPOC Scholars – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville

HERI-FAC2017-monograph.pdf (ucla.edu)


Celebrating International Open Access Week

International Open Access Week (IOAW), held this year from October 25-21, advocates for the right to use and access knowledge freely and without subscription and copyright limitations. Every year, IOAW attempts to raise awareness of the potential disparities that arise when some scholarship is made more exclusive and less accessible to the public. 

The theme for this year’s IOAW is “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.” This theme was created to align with the recently released UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science:

Open Science should embrace a diversity of knowledge, practices, workflows, languages, research outputs and research topics that support the needs and epistemic pluralism of the scientific community as a whole, diverse research communities and scholars, as well as the wider public and knowledge holders beyond the traditional scientific community, including Indigenous Peoples and local communities, and social actors from different countries and regions, as appropriate. (UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, Page 7)

Often large publishers force academics to sign contracts limiting publication of their work to a single journal, and then charge high subscription fees for access to the work. This creates a disparity in who can access the knowledge. 

ThinkIR, UofL’s Digital Institutional Repository, offers an online venue for sharing the work of our researchers, making it free, open, and accessible to a wide audience. There are no paywalls, no copyright contracts. ThinkIR is managed and hosted by the University Libraries. 

Helpful Links and Resources

Home – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville 

2021 Open Access Week Theme to be “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity” – Open Access Week