Interest in Dystopian Fiction Surges

By Carolyn Dowd and George Martinez

Following the November election, George Orwell’s 1984 became an instant best-selling novel. It is one among a number of 20th Century dystopian novels making a resurgence in popularity recently. A bitterly contested American election and subsequent change in governing style may have prompted some to seek out fictionalized accounts of dystopian realities, as an odd form of comfort.

1984

What is dystopian fiction?  Contrary to utopian fictions, in which an author projects an ideal worldview of humanity, dystopian fictions offer a darker vision of human behavior, where desired societal norms are turned on their heads. Thus, a society might led not by a beneficent, wise and humane ruler, but an immature, inhumane, simple-minded fool.

In 1984, Winston Smith lives under the intolerable, crippling and constant scrutiny of the ironically named ruler of Oceana, Big Brother. His attempts to find individual freedom within such a society forms the main drama of the novel.

Other examples of dystopian fiction include Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World,  Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.

Want to dig further into our collection of dystopian fiction? Here’s a list:

handmaids taleThe Road by Cormac McCarthy

Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson

The Stand by Stephen King

V For Vendetta by Alan Moore

Battle Royale by Koushun Takami

Blindness by José Saramago

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard

Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

 

 


New Peer-Reviewed Journal in ThinkIR

By Rachel Howard

Most peer-reviewed academic journals are subscription-based: some require high fees from academic libraries and their institutions, while others charge authors directly if they want to make their content freely available to other scholars and researchers through open access. The University of Louisville recently launched its own open access, peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Respiratory Infections, using ThinkIR, the University of Louisville’s institutional repository in University Libraries.

Released on January 30, the new journal is one of several open access journals planned for hosting in ThinkIR that will serve the needs of scholars and researchers worldwide regardless of their means and without toll barriers.

img_7675bestLeft to right: Rachel Howard, Sarah Frankel, and Jessica Petrey of University Libraries; Dr. Julio Ramirez, Dr. Bill Mattingly, Kimberley Buckner, and Matt Grassman of Division of Infectious Diseases.

Doctors in UofL’s Division of Infectious Diseases approached their Clinical Librarian, Kornhauser Library’s Jessica Petrey, last year about their idea to publish two open access journals: one focused on respiratory infections and the other on refugee and global health. They had thought through the aims and scope of these journals, and identified who within the division and the field they wanted to be involved, but they needed the Libraries’ help with hosting it and providing digital preservation of journal content – a prerequisite to getting it listed in PubMed.

Jessica put them in touch with Rachel Howard, Digital Initiatives Librarian, whose work involves digital preservation as well as open access. As a result of the work of Rachel, Sarah Frankel, the Libraries’ Open Access and Repository Coordinator, Dwayne K. Buttler, the Evelyn G. Schneider Endowed Chair for Scholarly Communication at UofL, and the Scholarly Communication and Data Management Work Group, the Libraries developed policies, procedures, and agreements to support the Division of Infectious Diseases as a pilot project for a new phase of repository development. Jessica expanded her support of the Division by serving as copy editor of the journal.

On January 30, 2017, the Division of Infectious Diseases celebrated the launch of Journal of Respiratory Infections Volume 1, Issue 1, with a party at MedCenterOne. Petrey, Howard, and Frankel were in attendance, where they were warmly thanked by Division of Infectious Diseases Chief Dr. Julio Ramirez.


Executive Orders: Best Sources for Research

by Erin Gow

Perhaps not surprisingly, given recent news, the Law Library has seen a sudden surge in questions about U.S. executive orders.

Wondering how to find out more about them? Here are a few good resources to get you started.

Executive orders are published along with other Presidential documents in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 3, which you can access online, in print in the library, or through a subscription database such as Bloomberg Law, HeinOnline, Lexis or Westlaw.

To see recent executive orders visit the White House page. The American Presidency Project and Federal Register also reproduce executive orders, although there may be a slight delay before the latest orders are available.

For current and older Presidential documents, consult the FDsys compilation, which includes executive orders along with letters, statements and other documents.

Historic executive orders are available through the National Archives and through HeinOnline’s Daily and Weekly compilations of Presidential documents.

For more information about the issuing, modifying and revoking of Executive Orders, see the Congressional Research Service’s 2014 report.


He swings, fans swoon: UofL library displays its renowned Tarzan collection

UofL Archives and Special Collections will display a portion of its enormous Edgar Rice Burroughs collection July 1, just in time for the release of the new “The Legend of Tarzan” film. Burroughs famously created the original Tarzan character and stories.

The Burroughs collection is the largest in the world, with more than 100,000 items such as first-edition books, fanzines, film stills, scrapbooks and posters, games and other memorabilia from the author’s life and works.

Known as “The Grandfather of American Science Fiction” Burroughs penned 63 novels, 21 short stories and 26 literary sketches. Originally writing for pulp magazines, Burroughs quickly mined a deep vein with his Tarzan character by capitalizing on the stories’ success by allowing merchandisers to create knives, bows and arrows, belt buckles, watches, figurines, candy, bread, pop-ups, coloring books and costumes. Many of these items are part of the collection.

Beginning July 1, to synchronize with the movie’s release, ASC will exhibit editions of “Tarzan” in 37 different languages, to emphasize the worldwide appeal of Burroughs’ iconic character. It will be on the first floor of Ekstrom Library, in the west wing across from the circulation desk, and run until Sept. 2, one day after Burroughs’ birthday.

“What better time to showcase some of this important collection, which means so much to the numerous fans of Burroughs, than at the release of another ‘Tarzan’ movie,” said Carrie Daniels, director of Archives and Special Collections. “Just the fact that this story, with an indelible character at the center, prompts a major movie release shows the longevity and imaginative depth of Burroughs’ original tale.”

Most of the collection was donated and curated by Archives and Special Collections Professor and Curator Emeritus George T. McWhorter, as a tribute to his mother, who taught him to read early in life using Burroughs’ stories. The collection is officially named in her honor.

In addition to the displayed exhibit, all items from the collection are available in Archives and Special Collections Research Room, Ekstrom Library, lower level 17. Anyone with a photo ID may view or research individual items 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

For more information, contact Daniels at 502-852-6676 or carrie.daniels@louisville.edu.


Libraries’ Expanded Electronic Collections Allow for Easier Research

Beneath the flurry of renovation on the third floor in Ekstrom Library, the Libraries have made some strategic moves to allow for expanded digital access to some bound journals that have been removed prior to construction.

Older, hardbound journals have been removed to clear space for the Delphi Center’s new Teaching Innovation Learning Laboratory (TILL), slated for construction this summer in Ekstrom. However, these collections haven’t gone away; most have either been replaced by digital versions, or moved to the Robotic Retrieval System (RRS). In most cases, the Libraries are expanding access to journals and other collections.

“We’ve increased the number of journal titles available digitally,” said University Libraries Dean Bob Fox. “This will greatly benefit all the Libraries and their patrons.”

“In some cases, we’ve been able to provide access to all editions of journals that were previously only available in part.”

The Libraries’ administration has forged agreements with publishers, including Mergent, for business collections; JSTOR, for humanities and social science materials; Wiley, for science, public health, medicine, and social sciences titles; and the NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine).

“The TILL, the expanded collections, and, in future, the renovated learning spaces, are all ways the Libraries are working to advance the University’s research and teaching mission,” Fox said.

Fundraising efforts are in place to renovate the entire third floor, to upgrade student seating and study spaces. Over the summer, an additional arm of the RRS will be built to house lesser-used journals and other materials removed from the third floor.


Ekstrom’s Third Floor Renovation to Provide New Learning Laboratory, Greater Study Space

If you walk around the third floor in Ekstrom Library, you’ll notice some changes in progress. Crews have removed furniture and dismantled shelves in the northeast to make way for enhanced study spaces, more comfortable seating, and a new teaching laboratory.

With a fully renovated third floor as the ultimate goal, space is currently being cleared for construction of the Delphi Center’s new Teaching Innovative Learning Lab (TILL), which is set to open by Fall semester 2016.

Currently in the final design phases, the TILL will provide space and equipment for faculty to learn and experiment with innovative teaching methods. The new laboratory, which is part of the University’s 21st Century Initiatives and supported by Interim University Provost Neville Pinto, will provide a large learning lab, collaborative spaces, conference rooms and offices for Delphi Center staff. Construction will proceed throughout the summer to prevent major disruption for students.

Rendering 3rd fl

Vision for eventual third floor renovation.

Some logistical changes will confront visitors in the near-term: several large study tables frequented by large groups have been moved to the second floor, where recently upgraded lighting will better serve group study.

 

Reference materials formerly shelved in the northeast have either been relocated to the Robotic Retrieval System (RRS), or replaced by expanded online databases available via the Libraries website.   For example, databases such as JSTOR (http://www.jstor.org/), a digital repository of academic journals, books, and primary sources, has been expanded to offer access to new materials.

For the relocated physical reference books and other materials, Ekstrom plans to build a new arm within the RRS. Libraries Dean Bob Fox worked closely with the Provost and the Delphi Center to move this key library priority forward.

Remaining renovations to the third floor, including new study areas, furniture and other enhancements, are part of later phases of the project.


Bound Together: Two New Exhibits Highlight the Art of Bookbinding

In an era when tablets and screens compete to replace printed media, it seems important to understand the pleasures and physical intricacies of books. Two exhibits focused on bookbinding structures, held at UofL’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC) and Bridwell Art libraries, aim to enlighten visitors on these pleasures. The two exhibits, “Under Cover: Five Centuries of Bookbinding” and “Folded Books” feature unique and artful bookbinding methods.

Hanmer_Biblio-1

Biblio Tech book set. Photo courtesy of Karen Hanmer

Highlighted in “Under Cover” is the art book set Biblio Tech: Reverse Engineering Historical and Modern Binding Structures with a Focus on Board Attachment, created by book artist Karen Hanmer.  This set of model books is designed to be used by students learning new bookbinding structures.  Each of the 12 miniature books is only partially completed, allowing the viewer to see the steps taken to sew and glue the final bindings together.  To compliment these contemporary samples, several finished books will be shown at the ASC Library.

“We chose to purchase Biblio Tech due to the very instructive nature of each model,” said Bridwell Library Director Sarah Carter.  “The set comes with an instruction booklet, which students may use to learn how to sew their own book.  Our entire artist’s book collection, with over 300 items, is a teaching collection.  That means that students may examine them in person, versus looking at them in a display case.”

The book is a recent gift to the Art Library from Guy and Libbye Montgomery, Libraries donors who greatly value physical books, and who wished to support hands-on study for student learning. Another book presented within the ASC exhibit was conserved through the Montgomerys’ funding is a Little Gidding version of the Book of Common Prayer.

“I’m excited to show Bridwell Library’s new book alongside such beautiful and fascinating specimens from Archives and Special Collections,” Carter continued.  “I think that anyone who sees the models side-by-side with a finished example will have a better appreciation for the complexities of bookbinding.”

A companion exhibit, “Folded Books,” will also be on display simultaneously in Bridwell Art Library.  The focus is a small selection of artist’s books which use only glue and folded paper, rather than the sewn bindings emphasized in “Under Cover.”  Unusual bindings, such as flag books, tunnel books, and ox-plow books, will be on display.

“These book structures are aligned with pop-up books, but professional artists use these structures in their work to convey complex ideas that wouldn’t have the same effect in a more traditional format,” said Carter.

Students and faculty may contact Carter to make an appointment to see additional examples of artist’s books.

 

Under Cover: Five Centuries of Bookbinding

February 1st through April 30th

Archives and Special Collections Library

Ekstrom Library Lower Level

 

Folded Books: Selections from Bridwell Art Library’s Artist’s Books Collection

February 1st through April 30th

Bridwell Art Library

Schneider Hall 102