UofL Law Librarian writes legal volume on hate crime

UofL Law Librarian Erin Gow is the author of a new volume in Hein’s Legal Research Guide Series on the topic of hate crime. While the publication date was pushed back amid the COVID-19 outbreak, as of July 15 the hardcover edition of Vol. 81 was on the shelves in the Brandeis Law Library.

Through the process of research and writing, Gow said she learned quite a bit about the evolution of laws surrounding hate crime.

“There have been massive changes in hate crime over the past few decades. The very concept of what a hate crime is, who can be the victim of a hate crime, and how hate crimes are responded to legally have all changed dramatically,” she said.

Erin Gow

Erin Gow

“In the US, for example, the Hate Crimes Prevention Act was only passed just over a decade ago in 2009. Many individual states had hate crime laws before this, and the federal government had been collecting statistics on hate crime for many years, but the Hate Crimes Prevention Act changed the whole legal landscape around hate crime in this country.”

“Right now there’s some evidence that hate crimes are increasing in the US and other parts of the world, and that means laws are being tested and observed in new ways.”

Gow said she assembled the proposal in November 2018 and then wrote the volume in and around her other full-time work as Online Services Librarian, finally finishing with a review of the final draft in February 2020.

“When I realized Hein’s didn’t have a volume on hate crime, I proposed the topic to the publishers,” she said. “They reviewed a sample chapter, and accepted both the topic and me as the author.”

All volumes are published both in print and electronically on HeinOnline.

 


Donor Spotlight: Dr. Donald and Catherine Cathy Shoemaker

During last fall’s 50th Anniversary celebration for 1968-69 UofL graduates, Dr. Donald Shoemaker and Cathy Shoemaker visited the Belknap campus for the first time in almost as many years.

“It was amazing, completely different,” said Don. “We couldn’t believe how things have changed.”

Don admits that over the years he had been immersed in his medical practice as an anesthesiologist at Baptist Health in Louisville and hadn’t kept up with the growing campus. “I went to med school in 1968 and hadn’t seen it since and the whole time the campus was growing. My goodness. The way it expanded was amazing.”

Don and Cathy Shoemaker

Don and Cathy Shoemaker

UofL Archivist and Historian Tom Owen led the couple on a lengthy tour of the campus, fielding questions about buildings and settings both familiar and unfamiliar. Owen is well-known for leading Belknap History Walking Tours throughout the year where he plays raconteur and tour guide for groups of faculty, staff, students and Louisville residents.

“He took us out to the new music school, where it was all older houses when I was in school,” said Donald, referring to the building built in 1980 which now contains the School of Music, Comstock Hall and Music Library. “There are three old buildings nearby and I used to take Poli-Sci, English and other classes there.” Facing north, “there was a stone wall, a parking lot and a pizza place” that once lined the now long-gone Shipp Street.

“On the south side of the campus I remember the Purina silos that they tore down. They moved the observatory and other buildings, just pushed them back.”

Cathy, who earned a master’s degree in social work, said that back in the day, “Kent School was in a large yellow brick house near the old Confederate statue. I took a statistics course in the garage.”

The couple were also impressed with the Foucault pendulum clock installed on the ground floor of Grawemeyer Hall in 1978. “The ground level, where you now see the pendulum, was the finance office where we would drop off our tuition checks.”

Don remembers the main library in Schneider Hall – now the site of Fine Arts and the Bridwell Art Library –  to study between classes and before fraternity events. He remembers the long fountain on the building’s east side was occasionally visited by soap bubbles as pranking students poured in laundry detergent.

“As a science major, I had all my classes in one building, the natural sciences building by Eastern Parkway. Now all the sciences have their own buildings. I’d just wait in the Natural Sciences library before classes.

“I’d be walking my legs off now, but probably I’d be in better shape.”

Since graduating from UofL, the couple has been busy with careers and raising a family of three daughters. Their eldest daughter also has strong UofL ties: Amy Shoemaker is the Associate Athletic Director for Administration and Deputy University Counsel. Lisa Borden, their middle daughter is a UofL medical school graduate and pediatrician in Middletown, and youngest Kristin Shoemaker is a commercial airline pilot, living in Charlotte North Carolina.

Cathy and Don were born and raised in Louisville and graduated in 1964 from local high schools, Cathy from Presentation Academy and Don from Seneca High School. Don’s fellow Seneca High School alum was Wes Unseld, the former UofL Cardinal basketball star who played for the Baltimore Bullets and was named NBA Most Valuable Player among other accolades. Unseld passed away on June 2, 2020.

“He helped our team win the Kentucky HS championship in our junior and senior years. We both went on to UofL; I went into med school and he went to Baltimore and had an NBA hall of fame basketball career.”

“He was a good, good guy. It was just a shock that he passed away. I saw him six years ago at the 50th HS reunion. We weren’t close personal friends, but we all rooted for him and I was proud of his talent.”

Cathy earned a master of science in social work from the Kent school. “First I went to Spaulding University and then I was a student at Kent School but I owed the state two years of work because they paid for my tuition,” she said. “I worked in Frankfort, teaching social workers how to lead therapy groups for families with dependent children.” She then worked as a clinical social worker for River Region (later Centerstone), and then after starting her family, she worked part-time for Seven County Services.

After Don earned a bachelor’s degree in Arts and Sciences, he entered the UofL Medical School and completed his residency at UofL Hospital. He served in the Air Force for two years in Omaha, Nebraska and then moved back to Louisville.

Cathy tells the story of how the couple met in 1970 at the old Louisville General Hospital – in the Psych ward, she says, laughing – while both were on rotation there. Cathy was working on her social work degree and Don was a medical student on rotation.

After they married, Cathy began working for the state of Kentucky, traveling all over the state to conduct trainings. At the same time, Don’s residency meant he worked overnight every third day.

“We used to joke that our marriage will last much longer than anyone else’s because we just hadn’t seen each other as much,” said Cathy.

In his long career – he retired in 2013 – Don has seen many changes in healthcare and in the world of anesthesia.

“Back in 1977, it was mostly MDs providing anesthesia, but now we need CRNAs, nurse anesthetists to staff all the areas where anesthesia is needed. Back in 1977, we had six ORs. Now there are close to 30, and they need anesthesia services in the endoscopy suites and delivery rooms, radiology, etc. Even in outpatient centers.”

“But during this COVID 19 crisis, I think people have changed the way they view anesthesiologists,” he continued. “They are heroes. They have to put people on ventilators, intubate them and keep them alive, keep their airways open as they battle the virus.”

Change has not only struck the healthcare profession, but also higher education and in particular, the University over the past 14 years of daughter Amy’s tenure. But though UofL had experienced some challenging times, Cathy and Don both expressed their enthusiasm for President Neeli Bendapudi and Athletic Director Vince Tyra.

“We have been very impressed with Neeli as a leader,” said Cathy. “She has been a stabilizing force and done a great job of turning things around.”

“We can’t say enough about her leadership. She’s personable, smart, and so energetic.”


Archives and Special Collections to preserve Allen-Martin Studio Collection

The University of Louisville’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC) will preserve studio tapes from the long-running, iconic Allen-Martin Studio, including recordings from bands such as The Oxfords, The Carnations, The Monarchs, Exile, Harvey Fuqua, Lester Flatt, The Rugbys and Bodeco.

The project originated with Marvin Maxwell, a drummer and founder of Mom’s Music, who purchased the master tapes in 2005 and has since released or re-released several recordings commercially with his partner, Walker “Ed” Amick. Maxwell has now sought ASC’s assistance in preserving the tapes.

 

OSR077LP_CU

An album of recordings from the studio tapes released by Maxwell and Amick.

Once a fixture in the local music scene and perhaps the oldest recording studio in the area, the Allen-Martin Studio was begun in the mid-1950s under a different name, eventually moving to 9912 Taylorsville Road until it closed in 1999.

The Allen-Martin Studio Collection includes recordings of most of the prominent bands who performed and recorded in Louisville during the 1960s as well as popular national acts, said Jeff Jobson, a music chronicler and aficionado who is collaborating with ASC personnel to help catalogue the tapes.

“This was an especially exciting time, since it was not uncommon for local Top 40 DJs to manage local bands and ‘just happen’ to give them a goodly amount of airplay,” before the rules changed in the 1970s and the practice was no longer allowed.

Not only are bands from the beginning of Top 40 radio in Louisville included, but also ephemera such as commercials and industrial information tapes.

“It covers a lot of people’s collective memories from their most formative years,” Jobson said. “I don’t know if I’m even able to convey the historical value of these tapes, as this lays the groundwork for nearly all the rock and roll history of the Louisville area.”

Jobson is currently also collaborating with ASC’s Oral History Center to provide access to interviews with local musical artists. In the interviews “many of them refer to the period of time in their youth when they had their collective ears glued to WAKY/WKLO. And with each mention, they stress the influence of that time in what they brought to the music scene. And those musicians impressed later musicians, and so on to the present day. This is Ground Zero for Louisville’s local rock music, which begat all of the underground scene which followed.”

Groups or artists among the collection include:

Copperfield
Quick Draw
Tim Krekel
Lester Flatt
Merseybeats
Carnations
Rugbys
H. Fuqua (Harvey Fuqua)
Brothers Pride
Monarchs
Bodeco
Premiers (Ali Shuffle)
Howie Gano
Crushed Velvet
Buster Brown
Will Cary
Names
Dorothy Boy
Freddy George
Exiles/Exile
Another Mule
Cosmo
Chukkar
Kenny and the Accents
Troy Shondell
Trendells


Bringing Gender Equity to Wikipedia: Bridwell Art Library Hosts 2020 Louisville Wiki Edit-a-Thon Remotely

Fighting a longstanding gender imbalance on Wikipedia, UofL’s Bridwell Art Library recently hosted the Louisville Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an event it has staged several times since 2014 to add and improve articles on lesser known female artists.

Enid-yandell-1896

Photo of Edith Yandell. Photographer unknown; 1896 / Public domain.

This year’s event welcomed UofL students, faculty and staff of all gender expressions to edit the site’s articles in a collaborative online setting. Articles on mostly local women artists were improved and edited, including Julie Chen, Ann Stewart Anderson, Adele Brandeis, Marcia Shallcross Hite, Nancy Rexroth, Enid Yandell, and Martha Holmes. Other improvements focused on the local company Hadley Pottery and popular Mexican artist Frida Kahlo

Originally scheduled to be held at the Speed Museum, this year’s event was moved to a remote setting due to COVID-19, and the Art Library plans to host next year’s event at the museum to increase visibility and boost attendance. A small group comprised of UofL staff and faculty met on Teams for two days during two-hour sessions.

“Hosting an event whose aim is to inspire comradery and passion in a remote setting was challenging, but worth it,” said Art Library Director Courtney Baron.

“We can already see the impact our local event has on improving the coverage of women artists on Wikipedia. Perhaps this year the most valuable accomplishment was the transition from an in-person to a virtual event. We were able to accomplish a lot remotely.”

Prior to the Edit-a-thon, Baron and her colleagues, Collections Coordinator Trish Blair and Circulation and Reserves Manager Kathy Moore, created a research guide, with a list of articles that need to be improved.

“There is still a lot of work to do to mend the gender gap on Wikipedia, especially in regards to arts content and editorial representation,” Baron continued. “More women need to be contributing to Wikipedia because their participation has a huge impact on the content.”

While conducting research to create the guide, Baron said “we discovered so many Kentucky women artists who are not featured at all on Wikipedia. This means they are largely unknown outside of our region.”

“Our next step is to create stub articles for these artists that can be expanded at future edit-a-thon events.”

One of the world’s most-visited websites, Wikipedia is maintained and edited by mostly male volunteers, resulting in well-known gender bias. In 2014, the feminist nonprofit Art+Feminism founded a worldwide Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon to encourage women to write new articles and edit existing pages on underrepresented artists.

The Art Library’s past Edit-a-thons have been well attended, open to UofL students, faculty, staff and members of the public of all gender identities and expressions. Participants have created personal accounts on Wikipedia and learned how to edit articles, using library resources to add citations and information to Wikipedia articles on local and regional artists.

“During this year’s event, 12 articles were edited with a total of 70 edits; over 4,200 words and 31 references were added, and two images were uploaded to Wikimedia Commons,” said Baron. “However small, these changes have had a significant impact. In just a few weeks, the articles have been viewed over 159,000 times by Wikipedia readers around the world.”

“We plan to host our 2021 event at the Speed Art Museum and will focus on Kentucky women artists with a focus on community outreach. We hope the location at the Speed means we can reach a broader audience than we would have if we held the event on campus. This is one of the many efforts we are making to increase our collaboration and strengthen our partnership with the Speed Art Museum. The close proximity to the museum – a 5 min walk – in which we can see and interact with works from the Kentucky women artists we are researching and writing about on Wikipedia, is so valuable.”


UofL Digital Content Portal

Exploring digital content from the University of Louisville just got easier. The new portal provides an easy way to access faculty scholarship, theses and dissertations, UofL and student-produced publications, as well as archival photographs and newspapers, digitized interviews, and more.

The portal includes search boxes that make it simple to dive right in and explore. Visit it at https://library.louisville.edu/digital-content.

UofL Digital Content homepage

Indigo, Cochineal Bugs, Onion Skins, and Pokeberries: The Legacy of Alma Lesch

Bridwell Art Library staff member Kathy Moore reflects on the legacy of renowned fiber artist Alma Lesch and fondly recalls taking her class during her sophomore year at UofL.

Alma Lesch’s connection to UofL is long and storied; during her first stint as a teacher, she joined the Louisville School of Art in 1961, and after that was absorbed by UofL, she became an Adjunct Faculty in the Hite Fine Arts Department (where she founded the Textiles program) until retiring in 1982.  Alma’s second and more famous career took off while she was in her 40s, when she developed fabric collage portraits that were adorned with personal objects, which earned her accolades of Master Craftsman by the American Crafts Council (1974), and The Governor’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in Arts (1987).

Southern Gothic

1973 “Southern Gothic,” 27.5″ x 39″, fabric collage portrait; shown in first World Craft Exhibition, Toronto, Canada 1974, currently on display at Bridwell Art Library, UofL.

Alma Lesch

Alma Lesch workshop “Vegetable Dyeing,” 2nd Southeast Region Workshop, Memphis Academy of Arts, June 9-11, 1967.

My small connection to Alma was in 1976, when I was a sophomore here at UofL. Although my major was Biology, my work-study job was at the Bridwell Art Library, which worked out well since I loved historic costumes and crafts. When I saw a class on Natural Dyes I jumped at it. Held in the 1900 brick building now known as the Honors Overseers House, and taught by Alma, I didn’t know she was already famous, both for her textile arts but as the author of the book we used in class: ‘Vegetable Dyeing: 151 Color Recipes’ (1970). Huge pots full of different plants, mosses, barks and insects boiled on table-top gas burners, while we hand-twisted hanks of yarns into skeins that took on the whole range of colors in the rainbow. Indigo (blue), cochineal bugs (scarlet), onion skins (orange) and pokeberries (pink) all were tried with varying results. It was magic! Alma was patient with our mistakes, but her total focus on the craft and no-nonsense work ethic imbued in all of us a respect for the old timey traditions that were relevant once again, and that sticks with me still.

Vegetable Dyeing

Vegetable Dyeing; 151 color recipes for dyeing yarns and fabrics with natural materials” by Alma Lesch. New York, Watson-Guptill Publications [1970], ISBN: 9780823056002, Art Library Book Stacks  TP 919 .L47.


ThinkIR hosts 2020 Undergraduate Arts & Research Showcase

UofL’s annual Undergraduate Arts & Research Showcase brings together students from a variety of disciplines to make presentations on their research and creative projects; students are selected by faculty to create large-scale academic posters, defend their work, answer challenging questions and criticism, and in the process connect with a community of scholars.

However, with this year’s event disrupted by COVID-19, organizers had to decide whether to host a virtual event, and if so, how and where. Could they make a virtual event as meaningful to students?

UAR Showcase page on ThinkIR

The answer is largely yes, said Linda Fuselier, Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and Associate Professor of Biology. Not only was this year’s event well-attended and well-reviewed, the process of judging was smoother, creating posters was vastly less expensive, and because it was hosted by the University’s institutional repository ThinkIR, the students’ scholarship will be preserved on a free and open access site, said Fuselier.

Research projects included a study of the Belknap Campus’ heat island effect, an analysis of an opioid alternative and its potential abuse, and research on the influence of Social Appearance Anxiety on Eating Disorders (EDs) across age groups.

“One of the nice things about using ThinkIR is the visibility that the student work will receive, since it is searchable and publically available. ThinkIR is what made this possible.  Also, because these are archived in ThinkIR, we have a ready source of documentation and a way to ‘count’ research that we did not have before,” Fuselier said in an email exchange.

Sponsored and managed by the University Libraries, ThinkIR is an open-access platform for the scholarship and research of the UofL academic community.

“I’ve been promoting ThinkIR for these sorts of events in the future and I can see how ThinkIR and the library could be instrumental in promoting student research at UL (this is in the strategic plan!),” Fuselier said.

While students attending the April 15 event remotely didn’t have a chance to defend their work orally and participate in a question and answer session with faculty, Fuselier said there were “advantages to moving to a virtual setting.  It is less expensive for both the event planners and the students.  Students do not have to print posters but they still have the experience of making professional posters.”

Whereas before, judging took place within a short timeframe while students were present, this year, judges could review posters “at their leisure rather than having authors and judges be in the same place at the same time.”

“The library was EXCELLENT in being willing to work with us at the last minute, make changes to poster submission, and work with the vendor to create a great platform within ThinkIR to showcase student work.”

“We received lots of positive feedback for getting the event online given all else that was happening.  People really liked how the posters and abstracts looked online and that they were easily accessible on ThinkIR without too much searching.”

Unfortunately, technical challenges impeded the planned addition of the annual Celebration of Student Writing to the event this year, said Fuselier.  “Using ThinkIR was a two-step process that worked well enough but, we definitely have a few things to improve upon,” she said.

When asked whether the event would move to a virtual format permanently, Fuselier said “Good question.  It went well enough that it is certainly a possibility.”

The winners of the UAR Showcase are below:

Humanities/Music – Elaine Slusser
Diversity in Music Therapy: A Treatment Model for LBGTQ+ Affirming Care

Social Sciences – Rebekah Cook & Alexandra DuCloux
That’s IrrELEPHANT: Children’s Judgements of Relevant and Irrelevant Animal Observations

Natural Sciences – Madeleine Shelton
Conspecifics and Familiar Odors Alter Movement Patterns in a Land Snail, Cepaea Hortensis

To check out all the posters, visit webpage or contact Linda Fuselier.


2020 Virtual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

2020 Virtual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at the University of Louisville.

Announcing the 2020 Virtual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon hosted by the University of Louisville Libraries! Please join us as we participate in an international effort to close the gap on Wikipedia articles about underrepresented artists, with a special focus on local and regional women. You will create accounts on Wikipedia, learn how to edit articles, and use library resources to add citations and information to existing articles on your artists.

For more information, visit the 2020 Virtual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon guide.

Why edit Wikipedia articles on women artists?

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity, however, is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

Who can participate?

UofL faculty, staff, and students of all gender identities and expressions are welcome and encouraged to participate.

How do we participate?

Join the first event on Thursday, May 14, 2-4 pm via Microsoft Teams. Join the second event on Thursday, May 21, 2-4 pm via Microsoft Teams. Please share these links with anyone who may be interested in participating in the virtual events. You can come and go as you choose.

What can we expect from a virtual event?

You will research and edit at your own pace. Your camera and microphone should be turned off unless you are speaking.

Is experience editing Wikipedia required?

No! For the editing-averse, we will provide training on Wikipedia basics and assistance throughout the edit-a-thon. If you don’t already have one, register for a Wikipedia account in advance.

Which Wikipedia articles are we editing?

Please bring your ideas for entries that need updating or creation. Work on a topic of your own or choose from the list of suggested articles. Select an artist you can research using online sources.

How do we get information about women artists?

Consult the databases, e-books, and websites listed on the Remote Resources and Services guide to find research to support your article. We recommend starting with Oxford Art Online

This sounds like a lot of work!

You aren’t expected to write an essay on your chosen artist in a two-hour time period! Here are some ideas for quick and easy edits:

  • Add citations and references
  • Add images of the artist or example artworks
  • Link to other articles on Wikipedia
  • Edit text for clarity or copy edits
  • Add bibliographical information for an artist
  • Add a list of works for artists
  • Look at other Wikipedia pages to see what sections they have that you can easily add for your artist

Do you have a question we haven’t answered here? Email artlib@louisville.edu for more information!


Clinical Librarians: Behind the Front Lines

While the medical community grapples with the fallout from COVID-19, UofL doctors are depending upon a hidden asset to fight the virus: clinical librarians.

These invisible partners work behind the scenes make sure physicians, medical staff and students have relevant, timely information to complete their missions. Providing library support at clinical meetings, conducting literature searches, and creating online resource guides are the daily regimen for Kornhauser’s librarians.

“I simply could not function at full potential without a dedicated librarian.”

– Dr. Martin Huecker, research director for UofL’s Department of Emergency Medicine.

While clinical librarians help clinicians use verifiable best practices and evidence-based research throughout the year, they are now arguably more important than ever.

Jessica Petrey at COVID19 Outreach center

For example, Jessica Petrey, Kornhauser’s Associate Director of Clinical Services, works with UofL physicians and staff in six practice areas, including infectious diseases and emergency medicine, programs that are particularly active now. She attends weekly meetings – virtually and in person, practicing physical distancing – to help medical personnel work effectively as the pandemic rages locally. It’s all part of her ordinary job that has just become extraordinary.

“Our physicians have been deeply supportive of Petrey’s work and she is highly regarded by some world-renown experts,” said Kornhauser Director Vida Vaughn. “So many of our library personnel are invaluable to the medical community.”

In a testimonial email, Dr. Martin Huecker, research director for UofL’s Department of Emergency Medicine, says that he “simply could not function at full potential without a dedicated librarian.” In praise of Petrey, he notes “many instances of communicating via email during an actual ER shift, and receiving responses from Jessica that affected patient care.”

I rely on [Petrey’s] support for literature searches, content management related to point of care / real time clinical decision-making tools, and troubleshooting / access to those tools (clinical key, up-to-date, etc.). Emergency medicine is a specialty that relies particularly heavily on rapid availability of resources. Jessica answers emails with uncanny promptness.

Likewise, Ruth Carrico, Professor in the Infectious Diseases department, writes

The long-standing relationship the Division of Infectious Diseases has with the UofL Libraries has been one of tremendous value for our teaching, service, and research activities. Each week, Jessica Petrey, Association Director Clinical Services participates in our faculty meetings. During these meetings she provides insight and expertise in existing literature and research reports that address clinical questions as well as opportunities for additional research. As part of the COVID-19 response, Jessica worked with us to develop repositories for publications that helped us with development of new manuscripts for submission. In addition, the UofL Libraries have been instrumental in helping us maintain two peer-review journals that continue to grow in interest and impact.

“Our role is to make sure we’re facilitating access to information, sometimes in real time” said Petrey. “That is a more proactive role now with the volume of information coming out. People need a bit more help navigating it, and might not have time to ask.”

Published studies are also more readily available to the public now, as many proprietary scientific journals make COVID-19 research freely available to support a unified front against the current health crisis.

Helping clinicians and researchers stay on top of the information within a subject domain, even when it comes at a frenzied pace, is simply part of a clinical librarian’s job, says Vaughn.

“So many of our library personnel are invaluable to the medical community.”

— Kornhauser Director Vida Vaughn

“When you’re an embedded librarian no matter what the subject area – gastroenterology, family medicine or pediatrics – you have to stay on top of information. You’re always looking at the newest articles on the topic that are constantly coming out. We set alerts for research in subject areas and are pushing out evidence-based scholarship to the doctors we serve.”

After Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear suspended elective surgeries in March, all clinics and most research activity were canceled, after which Kornhauser faculty and staff saw a slight drop in requests for information. But after a few weeks, requests for assistance accelerated again.

“It started to sink in that normal is not something that’s going to happen any time soon, so they need to keep going with whatever research they can,” said Petrey. “So we’re starting to see requests picking back up again, and we’re even exceeding our normal workloads.”

After the University issued its work-from-home order, Kornhauser remained open for several weeks, but eventually closed its building to protect users and the Library’s workers, allowing personnel to work remotely. The closure hasn’t limited the Library’s instruction and service model since “nearly everything we do is online, with access to resources and collections there,” says Vaughn.

However, “the Health Sciences Campus is primarily comprised of professional students with jobs and families, and Kornhauser Library is a refuge-like study space away from home. So the library closure was something of a shock to our community,” Vaughn continued. “We are directing them to Ekstrom Library for study space, or the Student Activity Center during Intersession when Ekstrom is closed.”

Throughout the coming months as the medical community continues to grapple with the ramifications of COVID-19’s spread, Kornhauser librarians and staff will continue to serve them as always, behind the scenes, working diligently. And their work will continue to be appreciated. From Dr. Huecker’s testimonial:

I extend sincere gratitude to Jessica Petrey (along with John Chenault, Rachel Howard, and the UofL Libraries in general) for allowing me to practice efficient, evidence-based, up to date clinical emergency medicine while maintaining an active focus on scholarship.

Visit Kornhauser Library for more information.


Congratulations Art Library Student Employee Graduates!

Bridwell Art Library student employees Michelle Cao, Michael Chou, and Maree Grosser graduated from the University of Louisville this spring.

Michelle Cao

Michelle Cao graduated with a BA in public health. Here’s what Michelle has to say about her experience working at the Art Library:

“Moving to Louisville to attend UofL was a hard but best decision I have ever made. I have changed dramatically over the past 4 years and I believe for the better. From the friends I have made, to the jobs I have, the classes I have taken and much more, has positively shaped the person I am today and gave me the confidence to study abroad. It forced me to break out of my shell and really get to know myself and what I wanted to accomplish in life. By working at the art library, it taught and left me with experiences that made me feel like an art major just for a few hours a week but gave me a chance to explore my creativity and unlock new ones.”

Michael Chou

Michael Chou graduated with a BFA in graphic design from the Hite Art Institute. After graduation, he will work for Zimmer Design, a full-service branding + creative studio, in Louisville. Here’s what Michael has to say about his experience working at the Art Library:

“The art library is my go-to place for art and design inspiration. And to work here means more exposure to interesting books to stir up my imagination, working with fun coworkers, and an opportunity to promote the wonderful environment unique to the UofL campus. I will really miss coming to the art library between classes to check out books or study.”

Here are a few samples of his works:

  • “A Typographic Resource of Adobe & Google Fonts” is a 750+ paged type specimen book and resource designed from scratch—kind of like a catalog for fonts—to help designers locate free and quality fonts.
  • “Lunar Zodiacs” is an illustrative design concept for the Chinese Lunar Zodiacs, featuring color combinations inspired by Chinese imperial textiles.
  • “L&N Federal Credit Union: Rebrand” is a rebranding design project where Michael aimed to create a stronger visual identity for the organization while maintaining its significant legacy.

Maree Grosser

Maree Grosser graduated with a BFA in photography from the Hite Art Institute. Here’s what Maree has to say about her experience working at the Art Library:

“I have loved working at the Art Library for the last two and a half years! Working here has not only educated me further in art, but it has also taught me patience, strong work ethic, and the importance of a good printer. My favorite things to do while working are shifting books, looking through are incredible rare books section, and eating the delicious baked goods that Trish and Kathy bring in. I am grateful for getting to work with so many incredible people and will miss them the most when I graduate this semester. After I graduate, I am hoping to further my fine art career and education. My goal is to get my masters and help others extend their education in all things art. I am so thankful for getting my degree at UofL. This school has helped me find lifelong friends, and it has helped me find my passion for art.”

Here are a few samples of her works:

  • Left: “To Remember You (Rosemary)” from the BFA Show.
  • Top right: Maree pictured with her work at the BFA Show.
  • Bottom right: Still life.

Michelle, Michael, and Maree – congratulations on your graduation from UofL and thank you for your hard work and dedication to the Art Library!

Here are more ways to celebrate the Class of 2020:

BFA Thesis Exhibition
This semester the spring 2020 BFA Thesis Exhibition is presented virtually. Visit the exhibition page to read the artist statements and view their work.

Graphic Design Portfolio Day
Every spring the Graphic Design BFA program hosts a Graphic Design Portfolio Day to showcase their final design portfolios and meet with local and regional professionals. This year the Portfolio Day was presented virtually. Visit the portfolio page to see the students’ work.

Interior Design Portfolio Day
Every spring our graduating BFA Interior Design students present their portfolios in a day-long event to celebrate with family and friends and to present their work to regional professionals. This year the Portfolio Day was presented online. Visit the portfolio page to see the students’ work.