Applying Medical Theory to Daily Clinical Librarianship: Insights from Prestigious EBCP Workshop

To benefit their patrons – physicians, clinicians, medical and dental students – clinical librarians at the University of Louisville’s Kornhauser Library are actively seeking to deepen their understanding of contemporary medical theories and practice.

This summer, Assistant Director and Clinical Librarian Vida Vaughn attended the prestigious Evidence-Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) workshop at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.  Her main goals were to learn how to assess biostatistics in medical literature, expand her awareness of evidence-based practice, and become a better clinical librarian and teacher.

vida and dental students
Vida Vaughn, Kornhauser clinical librarian, interacts with dental students during a seminar break.

She soon realized that biostatistics analysis “is a graduate program in itself. But I came away knowing I can look at the literature more competently now.”

Vaughn’s work involves teaching students and clinicians on the Health Sciences Campus in the classroom setting, small groups or one-on-one, and also partnering with other medical educators. She said the workshop has helped her work more effectively, particularly with medical faculty at UofL.  Gaining their buy-in and confidence is a constant mission and based on hard work, she said.

“I learned how much physicians crave the assistance of a librarian. When they heard what I do for UofL Physicians, they were just amazed and wanted to know how to get something similar started in their organizations.”

“They have so much advanced medical knowledge and training that it can be challenging,” said Vaughn. “You have to work very hard to prove yourself, to begin to gain a level of trust. But when you help solve someone’s problem for them, they become your best advocate.”

The immersive, week-long workshop is designed to benefit physicians, nurses, dentists, clinical librarians and other health-care professionals, who learn more about EBCP – and how to teach it – in a small-group setting. EBCP is a contemporary approach to healthcare practice that “explicitly acknowledges the evidence that bears on each patient management decision, the strength of that evidence, the benefits and risk of alternative management strategies, and the role of patients’ values and preferences in trading off those benefits and risks.”

All attendees work for 10-hour days throughout the week to explore a broad curricula. Vaughn worked alongside three family practice physicians, two naturopath physicians, an optician, a research professor, a mentor in training, and another clinical librarian. “It was extremely extensive, very intense. Everyone leaves completely exhausted.”

What surprised her most was how clinicians truly view her work as a librarian.

“I learned how much physicians crave the assistance of a librarian. When they heard what I do for UofL Physicians, they were just amazed and wanted to know how to get something similar started in their organizations. The type of embeddedness and buy-in that exists at our institution is not readily available to many clinicians around the country.  At UofL, our clinical librarian team has made a concerted effort to be accepted as part of the medical teams. With some departments, I’m embedded to the point of being considered part of the furniture.”

Despite the asymmetry in medical training between the participants, there was no haughtiness or “lording it over anyone. Their attitude was, ‘We’re just here to help each other get through the workshop.’ It was an intense learning experience for everyone.

“I was pleasantly surprised by how supportive the physicians were on my process and learning. They were very engaged and mentored me through the workshops. In the critique of her presentation, her fellow group mates counseled, ‘You shouldn’t apologize so much for what you feel you don’t know because you know much more than you think.’

“I felt extremely sustained by that because I had felt quite out of my league at times.”

Vaughn, who is president of the Kentucky Medical Library Association, spoke about the workshop at a recent KMLA meeting and found a highly receptive audience.

“Now that we have made this investment in my learning, it’s my turn to come back and teach my staff and colleagues and impart the things I’ve learned.”


Kaleidoscopic Shelf Displays Show Art Library’s Collection

Talented UofL graphic design student creates sense of place for Bridwell Art Library.

Bridwell Art Library has discovered an inventive way to display its books: a colorful, edgy new bookshelf design showing patrons what they’ll find in the stacks – art and more art.

The shelving graphics, called endcaps, highlight call numbers for Bridwell’s collection, displayed over multilayered, fragmented images from within the library’s art books. Not only is the design of high quality, rivaling that of any professional graphic firm’s work, it was surprisingly local, the product of talented UofL graphic design sophomore Jenna White.

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Bridwell Art Library’s new endcaps reveal images from within art books in the stacks.

Bridwell Director Sarah Carter was first introduced to White in Fall 2015, when UofL Graphic Design faculty member and Power Creative designer-in-residence Leslie Friesen approached Carter with the idea of allowing Friesen’s graphic design class to use the library as a blank canvas of sorts, for environmental graphics within the space.  Carter would be under no obligation to implement a design, but if one emerged, the library had the option to see the project to completion.  The class gave students real-world experience, but also allowed them to explore the limits of their creativity without feeling too constrained by the client-artist relationship.

Eager to upgrade the library’s interior, and loathe to turn down an opportunity to work with student designers, Carter agreed.

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UofL graphic design student Jenna White designed the endcaps.

“I was happy to offer our space as their laboratory,” said Carter. “I knew we really needed something to display the call numbers at the end of the stacks shelves, something functional but with aesthetic parameters. So I agreed.”

The students first met with Carter to hash out details and learn about the library’s collection, color palette, furniture, lighting and environment. They then immersed themselves in the library’s interior space for several weeks, poring over stacks of art books, taking notes and pictures and “learning about us,” said Carter.  After a design charrette where Carter offered a critique of students’ work, they refined their designs.

“It was really gratifying to see, as a client, how they listened and met my needs,” Carter said.  “The trickiest part of the design was that the call numbers were variable, ranging from short to long, depending on how the books are catalogued, so the design had to be flexible for future updates and additions to the collection. Many of the students had innovative ideas, but they were not flexible or modifiable.”

Two designs emerged quickly as possibilities, though “one was a clear winner after the modification,” said Carter. “It was a very active design that accomplished the functional goals we had, enhanced wayfinding, but was aesthetically pleasing and visually exciting  ̶  and most of all, it was flexible.”

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Another view of the Art Library endcaps.

“I felt so honored to have my design selected,” said White, a UPS-sponsored sophomore and graphic design intern with the Alumni Association. “It was just a class project; we had no idea it would be implemented, but when it was, it was such a great opportunity.”

“I feel so lucky, even though it was a lot of work,” she continued.  “The class project took a semester, and then I worked with Sarah for the entire summer, pulling images from the books on the shelves. I spent a lot of time in the library and really got to know the place very well. The creative process was a bit faster than that. I knew how important it was to get it right for the librarians, because they have to look at these things all day. They had to like it.”

“This is the first time something of my own has been put out into the world. And I just thought, this is going to work,” White said. “I worked with this group of images and made a collage, played with filters and saturation until I found something that I thought looked great and showed it to Sarah and we worked on it.”

Finding the balance between aesthetically appealing graphic design and practicality was the main challenge, she said. “I was good at coming up with the creative side of things, but I had to work with Sarah quite a bit to make sure it fulfilled all the needs she had, like wayfinding. That was all new to me and more of a challenge.”

Carter says the process of working with a designer as a client helped her understand the patrons she serves much better. “It was really important to me, because I need to learn what they need so I can help them do their research,” she said.

“My favorite part about this whole process was working with Jenna and learning about the design process from a client perspective,” Carter continued. “As an art librarian, I am always trying to understand the way designers think so that I can help them in their research. It was extremely illuminating to hear her questions and watch her work to achieve the library’s goals. This process has helped me do my job better.

“I really wanted to invigorate the space and the endcaps really have done that. They help visitors conceptualize what we have on the shelves, and who we are.

“Our books are so much about visual information, but you can’t tell without opening them sometimes. They are like geodes, plain on the outside but sparkling inside. The primary content of our library is visual material.”

“I worked very hard to give Sarah exactly what she wanted,” Jenna said. “I really liked it, the way it evolved.”

Carter does, too: “It has become our identity,” she said.

White entered UofL as an art major and was involved in studio art, eager to grow as a painter. “But after I took my first graphic design course, I thought, ‘this is it.’ I just felt pure enjoyment and I was so successful, and then all these opportunities came my way.”

Carter was so impressed with White that she hired her as a student assistant for the library after the project was completed. White is also a graphic design intern with the Alumni Association.  But beyond those two commitments and her full class load, White works the night shift at UPS from 6 p.m.-8 a.m. three days a week.

Even though she stays busy, she has welcomed new requests for design work. “I try to say yes as often as possible,” she said.

“I love UofL,” she continued. “It’s a wonderful place. I feel like I’m leaving a mark.”

Photography by Trish Blair.

Changes to Library Site, Room Bookings, Research Appointments, and Request Forms

Heads up! Changes ahead.

The University Libraries are making some big changes to improve the user experience of our web site. We are in the process of moving our site entirely into the LibGuides content management system and making changes that we hope will make your time on our website more efficient and enjoyable.

What’s changing? These major areas:

  1. Library site design
  2. Room reservations – including reservable group study spaces!
  3. Appointments with librarians
  4. Request forms

Starting August 1st you’ll see changes in the site. The pages for the Art Library, Music Library, room reservations, hours, and request forms as well as the Research Guides will be in a new design. The rest of the site will be following and we will release the next batch to the public site over the winter break. As the pages move into the new system there will be a number of URL changes. For example, the Music Library’s URL will change from http://louisville.edu/library/music to http://library.louisville.edu/music/home.

New Music Library homepage

New Music Library homepage

The new design includes:

  1. A more consistent experience of what we formerly called “Research Guides” and now call “Subject Guides.” Each subject will open to a page that very concisely lists
    • the most recommended databases for that subject,
    • a list of the related subject and course guides, and
    • a picture and contact info for the subject librarian
  2. Throughout the site a tab appears on the right side of the page with buttons that:
    • provide contact info for the librarian most relevant to the page you’re on
    • open to a site search function
    • open to an “email this page” function
    • bring the user to the top or bottom of the page
  3.  A new font custom-made for its readability online called Merriweather.

Room Bookings

The rooms in our libraries are scheduled for many purposes from library instruction sessions to lectures by prominent leaders, authors, and scholars. In the past there have been multiple systems for reserving the different types of rooms, starting in the fall we hope to make this a lot easier for our patrons.

We’ll be using a new booking system called LibCal. People who want to schedule a room can look at the calendar, see what times are available, click on the time(s) they want, and make their request. It’s that simple. This system will be available to reserve rooms in Ekstrom Library, the Bridwell Art Library, and the Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library.

LibCal. Yellow times are reserved. Blue times are available. You can click any blue time to request a reservation.

LibCal. Yellow times are reserved. Blue times are available. You can click any blue time to request a reservation.

In the fall semester we’ll also be doing a pilot program to test using LibCal to allow students to reserve group study rooms. They’ll be able to go online and make a reservation for one of several group study rooms on the first floor of Ekstrom Library.

 

Research Appointments with Librarians

Our research librarians will begin using the LibCal system to schedule appointments online. We’re hoping this will reduce the amount of time between when a student/researcher makes a request and when they can see the librarian. Each librarian will enter his/her available times into LibCal and when a student wants to make an appointment they can just choose an available time that works for them. Easy peasy!

Forms

Our users may notice that forms are a little easier to use in the Fall. Some design changes will mean less scrolling, plus there will be fewer forms to choose from which we hope will make it easier to find the form you want. The new system allows us to ask “conditional” questions. When a conditional question is answered it provides different information depending on which option was chosen. This allows us to have a single form where multiple forms may have existed previously. For example, now there is one form for holds – regardless of which library has the item or whether the item is a book or video. If a person chooses book, for example, the form automatically shows just the questions related to getting a book.

So, yes, this is a lot of changes! We hope you find the new site fun and easy to use. If you have questions, don’t hesitate to ask – just Contact Us.


He swings, fans swoon: UofL library displays its renowned Tarzan collection

UofL Archives and Special Collections will display a portion of its enormous Edgar Rice Burroughs collection July 1, just in time for the release of the new “The Legend of Tarzan” film. Burroughs famously created the original Tarzan character and stories.

The Burroughs collection is the largest in the world, with more than 100,000 items such as first-edition books, fanzines, film stills, scrapbooks and posters, games and other memorabilia from the author’s life and works.

Known as “The Grandfather of American Science Fiction” Burroughs penned 63 novels, 21 short stories and 26 literary sketches. Originally writing for pulp magazines, Burroughs quickly mined a deep vein with his Tarzan character by capitalizing on the stories’ success by allowing merchandisers to create knives, bows and arrows, belt buckles, watches, figurines, candy, bread, pop-ups, coloring books and costumes. Many of these items are part of the collection.

Beginning July 1, to synchronize with the movie’s release, ASC will exhibit editions of “Tarzan” in 37 different languages, to emphasize the worldwide appeal of Burroughs’ iconic character. It will be on the first floor of Ekstrom Library, in the west wing across from the circulation desk, and run until Sept. 2, one day after Burroughs’ birthday.

“What better time to showcase some of this important collection, which means so much to the numerous fans of Burroughs, than at the release of another ‘Tarzan’ movie,” said Carrie Daniels, director of Archives and Special Collections. “Just the fact that this story, with an indelible character at the center, prompts a major movie release shows the longevity and imaginative depth of Burroughs’ original tale.”

Most of the collection was donated and curated by Archives and Special Collections Professor and Curator Emeritus George T. McWhorter, as a tribute to his mother, who taught him to read early in life using Burroughs’ stories. The collection is officially named in her honor.

In addition to the displayed exhibit, all items from the collection are available in Archives and Special Collections Research Room, Ekstrom Library, lower level 17. Anyone with a photo ID may view or research individual items 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

For more information, contact Daniels at 502-852-6676 or carrie.daniels@louisville.edu.


Law School News from World War II

The Law Library and I are pleased to announce the addition of Law School News Letters to our digital collections. As they were published during World War II and focused on those affiliated with the Law School who had served in the Armed Forces, Memorial Day seemed like an appropriate time to prepare and release them to the public.

1942 Pearl with Students

This photograph from 1942 features, from left to right, law librarian Pearl Weiler, Chester Hart, William (Bill) Harvin, and Shadrach (Shad) Boaz. Miss Weiler edited the newsletter. Each of the three gentlemen above joined the Armed Forces and were included within the News Letter pages, for better and, in one case, sadly worse.

In 1943, law librarian Pearl Weiler (later Von Allmen) began to compile excerpts of letters written to her and others in the Law School along with news gathered from other sources, sending the resulting newsletter to alumni back to the Class of 1940 and other persons affiliated with the Law School who served during the war.

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The popularity of the News Letter prompted Miss Weiler to expand coverage to the Class of 1939 by the sixth issue (it had already included more recent alumni as well as students who left law school to join the ranks), and then further expand it to any interested law school alumni the following issue. The News Letter ended with its tenth issue in February 1946 not out of lack of interest, but because, to roughly quote Miss Weiler, “so many of [them were] back in civilian life, it seem[ed] unnecessary.”

To that point, the last issue had a form for the School of Law’s records, which received nearly fifty responses, and more than a handful included notes of appreciation for the news or hopes – that Pearl shared – that the News Letter would turn into a Law School Alumni newsletter.

We are still awaiting word on whether or not we can post the responses online; while most of the respondents have likely passed on and the information found within them is not confidential, it is always better to be safe than sorry in privacy matters. In the meantime, they are accessible at the Law Library.


Use Your Phone to Study with ARTstor

By Trish Blair.

Back in the days before handheld technology, art history students used to create their own flashcards using a photocopier and glue stick.  Now ARTstor has created a mobile app that does all that work for you!

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ARTstor Mobile can be used to study art history images.

ARTstor is a more convenient way to quiz yourself on images as you study for finals.  Their mobile app has been released for the public on Android.  For Apple users, there is no app to download; just go to http://mobile.artstor.org from your mobile device.  Watch a short video about ARTstor Mobile here.

ARTstor is a digital library of over over 2,000,000 fully searchable images.  Images can be searched by keyword, date range, geography and classification.  Students can also create image groups for varying projects and interests.  Want a folder of all 111 images from Keith Haring?  You can have it.  Need to study Italian cathedrals?  Create a list based upon the date range and location in Italy.

Quiz yourself about artwork using ARTstor Mobile.

The prime feature of the mobile app is Flashcard View.  This allows students to view images without text – until you touch the image, thus revealing the information to double-check your knowledge.  Now students can be sitting on a bus, eating lunch or enjoying a sunny day at the park and still study using their mobile phones.

Registration is required to use ARTstor.  The good news is that UofL students get access to ARTstor thanks to the University Libraries.  Set up an account with a non-mobile device, download the app, and get to searching.  This can be done at any machine on campus or at home with a connection via the proxy server.


UofL Librarians visit “Niagara of the South” at Kentucky Library Associations Spring Conference

By Anna Marie Johnson

Discussions of community engagement, supporting graduate student publishing efforts, and high-quality, free information resources took place against a spectacular backdrop as librarians from UofL’s Ekstrom Library presented at the Kentucky Library Association’s Academic and Special Section/Special Library Association Joint Spring Conference at Cumberland Falls State Park near Corbin, KY, April 7-9, 2016.

CumberlandFalls2016RobCumberland Falls is home to the only moonbow in the Western hemisphere. While the moonbow was not in evidence during the conference, pre-conference and keynote speakers illuminated practices of assessment in academic libraries as well as the Framework for Information Literacy which helps librarians identify concepts that prove especially difficult for students as they navigate in a complex information environment.

Fannnie_KLA_SLA_2016

Fannie Cox

Librarians Sue Finley, Latisha Reynolds, and Fannie Cox, from the Research Assistance & Instruction (RAI) Department discussed the results of their survey of twenty different academic libraries which found hundreds of free websites and databases that could be used by UofL’s community, especially important in difficult budgetary times. Fannie Cox also presented on her work with community engagement, exhorting her audience to form collaborative partnerships on their campuses and to present and write about their efforts.

George Martinez, Samantha McClellan, Rob Detmering, and Anna Marie Johnson, also librarians from RAI presented on the Publishing Academy, a collaborative effort between

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George Martinez and Samantha McClellan

the Ekstrom Library Learning Commons and the School of Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies. A series of five workshops on topics such as copyright, open access, impact factors, and writing for publication combined with two faculty panels helped the twenty-student cohort peek behind the curtain into the often intimidating world of academic publication.

Finally, Tyler Goldberg, Head of Collection Development and Technical Services and her co-presenter from Northern Kentucky University speculated on the future of their work, complicated as it is by changing models of publishing and formats (e-books, etc.) as well as the systems that libraries use to keep track of the material they license or buy.


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