Use Your Phone to Study with ARTstor

By Trish Blair.

Back in the days before handheld technology, art history students used to create their own flashcards using a photocopier and glue stick.  Now ARTstor has created a mobile app that does all that work for you!

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ARTstor Mobile can be used to study art history images.

ARTstor is a more convenient way to quiz yourself on images as you study for finals.  Their mobile app has been released for the public on Android.  For Apple users, there is no app to download; just go to http://mobile.artstor.org from your mobile device.  Watch a short video about ARTstor Mobile here.

ARTstor is a digital library of over over 2,000,000 fully searchable images.  Images can be searched by keyword, date range, geography and classification.  Students can also create image groups for varying projects and interests.  Want a folder of all 111 images from Keith Haring?  You can have it.  Need to study Italian cathedrals?  Create a list based upon the date range and location in Italy.

Quiz yourself about artwork using ARTstor Mobile.

The prime feature of the mobile app is Flashcard View.  This allows students to view images without text – until you touch the image, thus revealing the information to double-check your knowledge.  Now students can be sitting on a bus, eating lunch or enjoying a sunny day at the park and still study using their mobile phones.

Registration is required to use ARTstor.  The good news is that UofL students get access to ARTstor thanks to the University Libraries.  Set up an account with a non-mobile device, download the app, and get to searching.  This can be done at any machine on campus or at home with a connection via the proxy server.


UofL Librarians visit “Niagara of the South” at Kentucky Library Associations Spring Conference

By Anna Marie Johnson

Discussions of community engagement, supporting graduate student publishing efforts, and high-quality, free information resources took place against a spectacular backdrop as librarians from UofL’s Ekstrom Library presented at the Kentucky Library Association’s Academic and Special Section/Special Library Association Joint Spring Conference at Cumberland Falls State Park near Corbin, KY, April 7-9, 2016.

CumberlandFalls2016RobCumberland Falls is home to the only moonbow in the Western hemisphere. While the moonbow was not in evidence during the conference, pre-conference and keynote speakers illuminated practices of assessment in academic libraries as well as the Framework for Information Literacy which helps librarians identify concepts that prove especially difficult for students as they navigate in a complex information environment.

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Fannie Cox

Librarians Sue Finley, Latisha Reynolds, and Fannie Cox, from the Research Assistance & Instruction (RAI) Department discussed the results of their survey of twenty different academic libraries which found hundreds of free websites and databases that could be used by UofL’s community, especially important in difficult budgetary times. Fannie Cox also presented on her work with community engagement, exhorting her audience to form collaborative partnerships on their campuses and to present and write about their efforts.

George Martinez, Samantha McClellan, Rob Detmering, and Anna Marie Johnson, also librarians from RAI presented on the Publishing Academy, a collaborative effort between

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George Martinez and Samantha McClellan

the Ekstrom Library Learning Commons and the School of Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies. A series of five workshops on topics such as copyright, open access, impact factors, and writing for publication combined with two faculty panels helped the twenty-student cohort peek behind the curtain into the often intimidating world of academic publication.

Finally, Tyler Goldberg, Head of Collection Development and Technical Services and her co-presenter from Northern Kentucky University speculated on the future of their work, complicated as it is by changing models of publishing and formats (e-books, etc.) as well as the systems that libraries use to keep track of the material they license or buy.


Kornhauser Library to Host MLA Webcast “The Consumer Health Library: A Site for Service, Education, and Hope”

Kornhauser Health Sciences Library is pleased to host another MLA (Medical Library Association) Webcast:

The Consumer Health Library: A Site for Service, Education, and Hope

Tuesday, April 26, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) in the History Room (3rd floor of Kornhauser Library)

Our address is 500 S Preston St. Louisville, KY 40292. Parking passes will be provided for those who plan to attend who are not affiliated with the University of Louisville.

Program Overview:

Consumer health libraries are a critical bridge for contemporary medicine models that require patients to both advocate for themselves, as well as partner with, their health care providers. With the continuously changing technology, the ever-increasing amount of information available, and patients’ real need to navigate successfully through the system, librarians’ services can provide the welcoming space and outreach to educate and inform our customers.

Learning Objectives:

By the completion of the webinar, participants will understand:

  1. the role of the consumer health librarian
  2. outreach into the local community
  3. the community or target audience
  4. issues regarding health literacy and how it impacts their library services
  5. specific programs that can be adapted to their institutional sites

Jacqueline Davis has worked for eight years as the consumer health librarian for Sharp HealthCare in San Diego, CA. She has had the opportunity to work in many different library settings and has enjoyed the work in each of them. She has a particular interest in health literacy as well as social justice. Combining both of these passions has informed and guided her work in the library and the community. In 2013, Davis received the Consumer Health Librarian of the Year award from the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section of the Medical Library Association. She has published in the Journal of Hospital Librarianship and Journal of Consumer Health On the Internet; contributed a chapter on marketing the consumer health library in the MLA book, The Medical Library Association Guide to Providing Consumer and Patient Health Information; and contributed a chapter in the soon-to-be published MLA book, Consumer Health Information Programs and Services: Best Practices. Additionally, she is also a passionate fan of cat videos.

There is no cost to attend this webinar. The sponsorship of this webcast site has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, under Contract No. HHSN-276-2011-00005C with the University of Illinois at Chicago.

A link to the participant’s manual will be distributed, and MLA (Medical Library Association) members can earn 1.5 MLA CE points for attending and completing the MLA evaluation form online. If you plan to attend, please respond to Tiffney Gipson at tagips01@louisville.edu by April 22nd.


Students Share, Learn, Improve Writing During Annual Event

By Rob Detmering

At the 2016 Celebration of Student Writing (CoSW) last week, UofL undergraduate students from a variety of courses showcased their writing through posters, readings, and digital media presentations. Over 100 students presented their work at the event, which was held March 30 in the Ekstrom Learning Commons, its location since 2014.

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Highlights of CoSW included “Concept in 60” digital videos, where students must convey a single idea in just sixty seconds.  Another event, genre analysis assignments, featured students exploring conventions of particular types of writing, such as scholarly articles in different fields.  As in years past, many confident and enthusiastic students attended the event to learn and showcase their writing, research, and learning.

Co-sponsored by the Composition Program, Ekstrom Library, and the Writing Center, CoSW was made possible through the efforts of Assistant Directors of Composition and PhD students Travis Rountree, Rachel Gramer and Drew Holladay, as well as the support of Director of Composition Brenda Brueggemann.

On the library side, Rob Detmering, Bruce Keisling, and Josh Whitacre provided liaison and logistical support; Delinda Buie and George Martinez represented the Libraries as judges; and Ashley Triplett created a wonderful promotional poster (below).

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Research Assistance Gives Student Lifetime Skill

When they need help with their writing, most UofL students know to contact the Writing Center, located in Ekstrom Library’s Learning Commons.

But what about the meat and bones of their papers: research, i.e., finding, evaluating and citing sources? For this equally challenging and unwieldy task, students have an excellent resource in the librarians in Research Assistance and Instruction (RAI), also located in Ekstrom’s Learning Commons.

Christian Bush

Photo by Ashley Triplett

A phone call or appointment made online will get students a face-to-face meeting with a research librarian, who can help them find relevant sources and learn better methods of research to benefit their future scholarship.

UofL sophomore Christian Bush is a recent convert to the benefits of research assistance. He thought such help was only available to students in higher grades.

“Students at all levels and at all times need this help, and don’t realize such a resource is available,” said Bush, a History and Asian Studies major. “When you first enter college, you have an impression that research appointments are sacrosanct; that only seniors working on their senior papers can get help.”

But after a savvy History professor suggested Bush reach out to RAI for help with his research, Bush found he could access the services himself. Required to create an archeological site profile for his class, History 341, Introduction to Egypt, Bush “did what most students do, I googled. But I couldn’t find any information on Google at all,” he said.

In particular, he needed a specific site profile from 1911 that was nowhere to be found. Exasperated, he set up an appointment with RAI online, after which the response was “lightning quick,” Bush said. “They called the next day.”

At the research appointment, RAI Librarian Sue Finley showed Bush not only the original excavation report he needed, but subsequent ones, up to modern-era excavation where ground-penetrating radar helps archeologists explore  underground tombs.

“I got a wealth of information,” Bush said. “More than enough to write my paper, and then some.”

But beyond helping with his immediate needs, Finley “took me through her methodology for locating the sources. She spent a good amount of time showing me how to use databases and work with sources, the nitty-gritty of the research.”

“If I hadn’t been able to meet with her I wouldn’t have had such a strong research base and it would have made the profile much less substantial,” he continued. “The fact that she taught me how to research and how to go through sources and then use the sources within sources; that’s benefited me outside that project.”

“A paper is only as strong as your writing skills and your research; if you don’t have solid research, there’s only so much you can do.”

The short-term results were important to Bush, too: “I got an A on the paper,” he said, smiling.


Feminist Wikipedia Editors Gather at UofL

A global phenomenon, Art+Feminism, arrived in Louisville on Saturday, March 19th when Bridwell Art Library and the Hite Art Institute co-hosted a satellite Wikipedia event.  Over the course of an afternoon, nine Wikipedians collaborated to write a new article about the International Honor Quilt (IHQ), an important community-based art project inspired by Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party artwork.  Although the quilt has been acknowledged as a precursor to the well-known NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, no Wikipedia article had been created for the IHQ.

View of Editors Seated at Tables

Editors work on the International Honor Quilt article at the University of Louisville. Examples of the quilt can be seen pictured in the background.

Co-organizers Trish Blair and Sarah Carter ran the event to teach community members how to create Wikipedia accounts, understand the anatomy of a wiki page, establish notability, and learn to code using wiki mark-up.  One experienced Wikipedian drove in from Lexington to attend the event and provide her support.  A grad student, community artist, UofL alumna, and regional quilter made up the rest of the work group.

 

Flyer and Books

Event flyers for the Wikipedia Art+Feminism event on top of a selection of useful reference books.

Writing the article involved locating published sources documenting the quilt.  This is where the Art Library’s collection of books and periodicals came into play.  Wikipedians were able to locate books and articles in the library that mention the quilt’s origin and importance within Judy Chicago’s career.  By the end of the day, the International Honor Quilt article was live on Wikipedia.

The Art+Feminism movement is in its third year, having held its inaugural edit-a-thon at the Museum of Modern Art in 2014.  According to an article published last year, the movement’s goal is to simultaneously “close the gender gap in both content and participation in Wikipedia.”  Louisville joined over 125 locations across Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, North and South America in holding a satellite event.


Libraries’ Expanded Electronic Collections Allow for Easier Research

Beneath the flurry of renovation on the third floor in Ekstrom Library, the Libraries have made some strategic moves to allow for expanded digital access to some bound journals that have been removed prior to construction.

Older, hardbound journals have been removed to clear space for the Delphi Center’s new Teaching Innovation Learning Laboratory (TILL), slated for construction this summer in Ekstrom. However, these collections haven’t gone away; most have either been replaced by digital versions, or moved to the Robotic Retrieval System (RRS). In most cases, the Libraries are expanding access to journals and other collections.

“We’ve increased the number of journal titles available digitally,” said University Libraries Dean Bob Fox. “This will greatly benefit all the Libraries and their patrons.”

“In some cases, we’ve been able to provide access to all editions of journals that were previously only available in part.”

The Libraries’ administration has forged agreements with publishers, including Mergent, for business collections; JSTOR, for humanities and social science materials; Wiley, for science, public health, medicine, and social sciences titles; and the NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine).

“The TILL, the expanded collections, and, in future, the renovated learning spaces, are all ways the Libraries are working to advance the University’s research and teaching mission,” Fox said.

Fundraising efforts are in place to renovate the entire third floor, to upgrade student seating and study spaces. Over the summer, an additional arm of the RRS will be built to house lesser-used journals and other materials removed from the third floor.


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