Note to Shelf: A Book’s Journey

One of life’s greatest pleasures is browsing bookshelves, searching for topics at random, finding the unexpected, neglecting all commitments to ponder at leisure.

Anyone seeking such non-digital delights can visit libraries on the Belknap or HSC campuses, or for virtual browsing, our website. But how did these physical and virtual books make it to the stacks and website, to be discovered by inquiring eyes and fingertips?

Each book’s journey to the shelf is deliberately egalitarian, says Tyler Goldberg, Head of Technical Services and Print Collection Development. Anyone affiliated with the University may request books, videos, recordings or other materials via this link on the Libraries’ website (http://library.louisville.edu/forms/order-recommendation). Allowing suggestions from University-affiliated individuals aligns with the Libraries’ mission to provide free and open access to information for our patrons.

After a request comes in, Tyler and Technical Services Acquisitions Specialist John Burton confer to determine: 1) whether we already have an item; 2) whether it meets basic criteria for inclusion in our collection; 3) if so, where to order it; and 4) how to pay for it.

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Shelves of book labels in Tech Services’ basement offices in Ekstrom Library.

After searching Amazon or other online sites, John orders an item, inspects it when it arrives, and ensures it is as advertised, i.e., not ripped, not missing pages, published in the wrong language, or another book altogether. (These errors have all happened.) Before the book is ordered, John has to choose a fund from which to order the book, either from an endowment or gift*, or from the main Libraries budget.

Continuing the journey, a book, DVD or other item arrives at a Technical Services staffer’s desk, to be barcoded, cataloged (added to Libraries’ online catalog), and passed to a staff member for labeling, stamping, and a final check. Items without records or incorrect information are bounced back to Tyler. For those items without records, she creates and adds a record to the WorldCat database.

Tyler

Tyler Goldberg (photo, Ashley Triplett)

After final processing, materials arrive at their final destination, perhaps the Browsing Collection on the third floor of Ekstrom Library, or the African American Collection on Ekstrom’s second floor, or the general stacks — wherever it will be among its counterparts, waiting to be gazed at fondly by browsing eyes.

So there you have it. Our librarians and staff deal with machinations behind the scenes so you can study, research, write that scholarly paper, or continue in the simple pleasure of book browsing.

 

*Many of our loyal and fantastic donors have contributed funds for general materials and specific genres, and the Libraries depend upon these gifts to augment our collections. Some of these funds support specific subject areas, such as Asian studies, humanities, engineering, women’s studies, finance, children’s literature, biology, American literature, and even railroads. Given the budget cuts to collections, these gifts are more valuable than ever.

 


Research DIY: Self-Guided Library

By Amber Willenborg

Research assignments can lead to enlightenment, but, as the scholarship on information literacy indicates, the path isn’t easy. The Project Information Literacy Freshmen Study found that students face many challenges with finding and using information, from locating appropriate databases to reading research articles and evaluating information. With this in mind, and in direct response to faculty requests for a one-stop research resource for students, the library has unveiled our new Research DIY website.

choose topic

Research DIY is an online tool featuring visually appealing infographics, videos, and step-by-step instructions to help students get started with a wide variety of research tasks. The PIL Freshmen Study revealed that students struggle most with formulating online searches, selecting and locating research resources, and reading and comprehending materials. On the DIY website, students will find resources that directly address these struggles: a video on generating keywords for searching, numerous videos with instructions for finding a variety of source types like scholarly articles, and an infographic on how to approach reading research articles. Research DIY also includes content created in conjunction with the University Writing Center to help students appropriately integrate sources into their research papers.

ask yourself

While the website is easy for students to find and use on their own, we encourage instructors to link to the site on Blackboard or in their syllabus, or direct students to sections of the website that would be helpful for particular assignments. In addition to Research DIY, the library offers a variety of teaching tools including online learning modules for practice with information literacy concepts and research guides for more in-depth information on research topics and resources. Librarians are also available to create custom content tailored to your class or assignment. The path may not be easy, but the library is here to illuminate your way forward to success.

additional tips


New Guide Provides Best Sources for Data and Statistics

By Chris Heckman, Intern, Research Assistance and Instruction, Ekstrom Library

Do you need to know the rate of accidental gun deaths in the U.S. between 2006-2012? What about the voting records of your representatives in Congress, or the percentage of households with running water in a particular Afghan province?

Finding very specific data like this can be a significant challenge for both new and experienced researchers. That’s why the University Libraries offers research guides, or collections of curated links to useful journals, databases, and depositories of statistical data, organized by subject. These can be invaluable resources for students beginning the research process, as well as for faculty who want to impart research skills in their students.

Social Sciences and Outreach Librarian Sam McClellan has recently added a new research guide, Finding Data and Statistics,  which provides links to several databases and search engines for use with a variety of topics. For example, Zanran is a search engine specifically designed for finding statistics on the internet. A search as simple as “birth rate Somalia” returns over 2,700 relevant graphs, charts, and tables for a researcher to easily narrow down and comb through. You can find a link to this research guide in any of the social sciences subject guides.

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The Finding Data and Statistics guide also includes links to social science data archives from universities such Cornell, Princeton, and Northwestern, all freely available for students at University of Louisville to use.

The new guide allows for narrowing by topic, including criminal justice, economics, education, environment, health, politics and elections, labor and employment, public opinion, religion, and urban planning and housing. Selecting any of these topics takes the user to a collection of links to useful data sources. For example, narrowing by “health” yields links to over 50 different data sources along with descriptions of those sources. These data archives are selected because they are freely available (or available to anyone with a UofL Library account), and because they contain a wealth of information for researchers interested in health issues in the United States and abroad. From statistics on the prevalence and mortality rates of specific diseases to information on access to healthcare by region, a wide array of information is available here at a researcher’s fingertips.

Data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Institute of Health (NIH) are available here, as well as data from international bodies such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and World Bank. Broad research tools such as CDC Wonder, a search engine provided by the CDC for navigating the agency’s public records, or WHOSIS, the WHO’s statistical information system, can assist with research on a wide array of topics, but there are also databases for more narrowly focused research areas.  For example, the AIDS Public Information Dataset from the CDC provides data specifically on HIV/AIDS incidence in the U.S., while the Cancer Statistics resource from NIH provides data on cancer in the United States. You can find data from some current large-scale studies here as well. For example, results from Princeton University’s ongoing Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study are useful for research on children’s health, particularly among children with single parents.

Several resources provide information on mental health concerns (the NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health, the HHS’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), child and adolescent health concerns (Data Resource Center for Child & Adolescent Health, Monitoring the Future Series, The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, UNICEF Data: Monitoring the Situation of Children and Statistics, Guatemalan Survey of Family Health 1995), and healthcare cost and utilization (Health and Medical Care Archive @ ICPSR, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HHS), Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (HHS)).

The Health section of the Finding Data and Statistics guide contains many more avenues for researchers to explore subtopics in the health field, and health is just one of the topics available in the guide. Anyone conducting research at University of Louisville should consider giving the research guides a try!


Executive Orders: Best Sources for Research

by Erin Gow

Perhaps not surprisingly, given recent news, the Law Library has seen a sudden surge in questions about U.S. executive orders.

Wondering how to find out more about them? Here are a few good resources to get you started.

Executive orders are published along with other Presidential documents in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 3, which you can access online, in print in the library, or through a subscription database such as Bloomberg Law, HeinOnline, Lexis or Westlaw.

To see recent executive orders visit the White House page. The American Presidency Project and Federal Register also reproduce executive orders, although there may be a slight delay before the latest orders are available.

For current and older Presidential documents, consult the FDsys compilation, which includes executive orders along with letters, statements and other documents.

Historic executive orders are available through the National Archives and through HeinOnline’s Daily and Weekly compilations of Presidential documents.

For more information about the issuing, modifying and revoking of Executive Orders, see the Congressional Research Service’s 2014 report.


Research Assistance Gives Student Lifetime Skill

When they need help with their writing, most UofL students know to contact the Writing Center, located in Ekstrom Library’s Learning Commons.

But what about the meat and bones of their papers: research, i.e., finding, evaluating and citing sources? For this equally challenging and unwieldy task, students have an excellent resource in the librarians in Research Assistance and Instruction (RAI), also located in Ekstrom’s Learning Commons.

Christian Bush

Photo by Ashley Triplett

A phone call or appointment made online will get students a face-to-face meeting with a research librarian, who can help them find relevant sources and learn better methods of research to benefit their future scholarship.

UofL sophomore Christian Bush is a recent convert to the benefits of research assistance. He thought such help was only available to students in higher grades.

“Students at all levels and at all times need this help, and don’t realize such a resource is available,” said Bush, a History and Asian Studies major. “When you first enter college, you have an impression that research appointments are sacrosanct; that only seniors working on their senior papers can get help.”

But after a savvy History professor suggested Bush reach out to RAI for help with his research, Bush found he could access the services himself. Required to create an archeological site profile for his class, History 341, Introduction to Egypt, Bush “did what most students do, I googled. But I couldn’t find any information on Google at all,” he said.

In particular, he needed a specific site profile from 1911 that was nowhere to be found. Exasperated, he set up an appointment with RAI online, after which the response was “lightning quick,” Bush said. “They called the next day.”

At the research appointment, RAI Librarian Sue Finley showed Bush not only the original excavation report he needed, but subsequent ones, up to modern-era excavation where ground-penetrating radar helps archeologists explore  underground tombs.

“I got a wealth of information,” Bush said. “More than enough to write my paper, and then some.”

But beyond helping with his immediate needs, Finley “took me through her methodology for locating the sources. She spent a good amount of time showing me how to use databases and work with sources, the nitty-gritty of the research.”

“If I hadn’t been able to meet with her I wouldn’t have had such a strong research base and it would have made the profile much less substantial,” he continued. “The fact that she taught me how to research and how to go through sources and then use the sources within sources; that’s benefited me outside that project.”

“A paper is only as strong as your writing skills and your research; if you don’t have solid research, there’s only so much you can do.”

The short-term results were important to Bush, too: “I got an A on the paper,” he said, smiling.


Libraries Embraces TRIO Program via Personalized Library Services

By now, most students on UofL’s main campus know Ekstrom has been renovated into a more modern, tech-friendly library, with a new services hub in the Learning Commons. However, Ekstrom is not just a pretty space.

The Belknap campus’ main library offers a wide range of services for students and faculty. Tailored, curated guides to research, research appointments offering one-on-one help, and instruction within individual classes are among the services provided by Research Assistance and Instruction (RAI) department (http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/research/). Often, students overwhelmed with the demands of their coursework are greatly helped by these services.

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Recently, RAI department began offering personalized library services to students who are part of the University’s TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) program. This pilot initiative, begun by RAI last semester, provides individualized outreach and assistance to any TRIO student. Currently some 141 students are enrolled.

The federally funded TRIO SSS helps students whose backgrounds may pose challenges to completing college. The program offers financial, academic and personal assistance to students who are disabled, from low-income backgrounds, or first in their family to attend college, and is completely free of charge. The goal is to increase retention and graduation. For more information, please http://louisville.edu/trio

“We thought this was a really great idea, to focus on the TRIO students,” said Anna Marie Johnson, Professor and Head of RAI. “We wanted to help students who may not have been introduced to library services before, and to help them with their research projects.”

“Particularly students from low-income neighborhoods may not have been enrolled in schools with libraries, or research resources,” she continued. “The more we can help serve this population, the more successful they will be, and the more the University will be successful.”

RAI has reached out to all 141 students with personalized emails offering advice and information, like available printing services, or study spaces offering technology inputs, and how to reach any of the RAI staff or services. So far a number of students have responded with questions about the library.

Future plans include an online module that will allow students to access videos that guide them in their research. Such modules will also be used for General Education classes introducing the University to freshmen. Johnson hopes for more one-on-one visits with TRIO students as well.

“We will be continuing this program in subsequent semesters and we hope to get a groundswell of interest,” Johnson said. “I’m always so happy when someone new comes in and finds out what help they can get; we’ve had some very happy students as a result.”

 


Libraries Upgrade Cloud-Based Catalog and Management System

As many of you are aware, the University of Louisville Libraries system is upgrading its catalog to the latest version, OCLC’s WorldCat Discovery, a cloud-based system. The upgrade, scheduled for early June, will enhance search capacity, expand user services, and continue to meet the evolving requirements of library faculty and staff.
Most of the changes will be minor shifts in the interface or functionality, but you may also notice changes in:
• The login screen for off-campus access.
• The process for renewing books online.
• The process for requesting items from the Robotic Retrieval System.
• The Journal Finder.
All changes will be described in this WorldCat Discovery Guide. (Please check back as the guide will be regularly updated).
Simultaneous to the switch of the catalog, a much larger transition will be happening behind the scenes, on the library staff side of the system. The UofL Libraries will move from the Ex Libris Voyager system, in use since 1998, to OCLC’s WorldShare Management System (WMS). The change in workflow is significant, as WMS’s technology represents an evolution to a cloud-based system of library operations. While some issues are inevitable in a transition of this scale, the Libraries will strive to minimize the impact on patron services.
Three other Kentucky universities, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky State University, Northern Kentucky University, have either gone live, or plan to soon, with WorldCat Discovery. Over 325 libraries in three countries are currently using WMS to share bibliographic records, publisher and knowledge base data, vendor records, serials patterns and more. UofL Libraries will be the third Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member to use the system.
The UofL Libraries apologizes in advance for any inconvenience caused by this upgrade, and welcomes your feedback on the new system. For any additional questions, please contact the Libraries’ WMS team: Tyler Goldberg (stgold01@exchange.louisville.edu), Randy Kuehn (rtkueh01@exchange.louisville.edu) or Weiling Liu (w0liu001@exchange.louisville.edu).