University Libraries Recent Promotions and Honors

Recently several University Libraries employees have been honored with promotions, awards or grants.

Alex Howard, Business and Entrepreneurship Librarian, and Fannie Cox, Outreach and Reference Librarian, both from Ekstrom Library’s Research Assistance and Instruction department, were awarded grants from the Office of Community Engagement Gheens Foundation Mini Grant Program. Howard received a grant based on her research study titled, Engaged Learning & Entrepreneurship: Supporting Campus & Community Collaboration. Cox was awarded a grant for “The Friends of Parkland Library Raise Awareness Project” to support the newly reopened Parkland Library.

Two women with brown hair stand holding certificates of recognition.
Alex Howard (l) and Fannie Cox hold their certificates of recognition.

The grants support programs which “will directly benefit the community through direct service, research, or outreach in collaboration with community partners.” Priority was given to projects in collaboration with underrepresented communities such as west and south Louisville, the immigrant and refugee community, rural communities, or the international community. Awardees were honored on Oct. 14 during an Awards Ceremony at the 2022 Community Engagement Luncheon.

Anita Hall, Assessment and Analytics Librarian, was recently awarded the Kentucky Library Association (KLA) Kentucky Libraries Feature Article of the Year Award for the article: The Impact of the Early COVID-19 Pandemic Response on Kentucky’s Library Workforce. Co-authored with Brandi Duggins, the article examines initial library responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in Kentucky and their effect on library workers. A study reveals that over 30% of respondents were affected by some type of employment-related measure, with 11% either furloughed or laid off.

The Libraries have promoted two librarians to assistant professor: Gina Genova, a Clinical Librarian with Kornhauser Medical Sciences Library, and Alex Howard, Business and Entrepreneurship Librarian with Ekstrom Library.

Genova started at the University of Louisville’s Kornhauser Health Sciences Library in November 2020 while the university was still working remotely due to COVID. Since then, she has worked with students across the health sciences campus and with several clinical departments, primarily pediatrics and otolaryngology. So far, her research has focused on finishing reporting for a fellowship project from her graduate program and on joining evidence synthesis projects, such as systematic reviews, with HSC faculty. She has presented work on systematic reviews at the Medical Library Association’s annual conference, and serves as an ambassador for the Kentucky region of the Network of the National Library of Medicine.

Howard began work in 2020 as an instructor and was promoted to assistant professor after two years of service. As the Business Research & Teaching Librarian, her primary role is to serve as the liaison to the College of Business and offer research assistance and instruction to students, faculty, and staff. She serves on the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Group for the University Libraries and in 2021 was appointed by the university president to serve on our university’s Commission on Diversity and Racial Equity. Her research as a tenure-track faculty member investigates how universities can support local Black-owned businesses in their communities.

She was selected to participate in the American Library Association’s 2022 class of Emerging Leaders, a prestigious national program that only accepts up to 50 participants annually from across the country. She was also named an Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Member of the Week in that same year.

In addition to her promotion to assistant professor, she was appointed to the role of Engaged Learning Coordinator for University Libraries starting November 1, 2022.


UofL Photo Archives receives full collection of Courier Journal photography

A treasure trove of roughly three million images have been donated to UofL’s Photo Archives by current and former owners of Louisville’s Courier Journal newspaper.

The Courier Journal – winner of 11 Pulitzer Prizes throughout its 154-year history – and its parent company Gannett have transferred its library of photographs and negatives to UofL Archives and Special Collections. Many of the images are iconic and capture important historical moments in the last century.

A black and white photo of a white child sitting in an empty school room desk shaking hands with a black child standing next to his desk.
At Greenwood Elementary, Mark Stewart, 8, seated, exchanged introductions with a new classmate, Darrel Hughes, also 8. The photo of the two young men shaking hands became the iconic image from Louisville’s days of forced busing to integrate teh city’s public school system. By Michael Coers, The Courier-Journal. Sept. 3, 1975

Members of Louisville’s Bingham family, which owned the newspaper from 1918 to 1986, have made a separate donation to support the collection, including preserving it, preparing it for use by the public, and developing programming to enable the public to engage with it.

Their combined generosity is creating the Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-Journal Photo Collection, a unique journalistic collection of local, state and national importance.

Black and white photo of four soldiers surrounding another injured soldier.
Soldiers in the heat of battle during the Vietnam War try to help a fallen comrade. By Bill Strode, The Courier-Journal. 1965

“We are incredibly grateful to the Courier Journal, Gannett, Emily Bingham, Molly Bingham and the rest of the Bingham family for making this historic gift possible,” UofL President Lori Gonzalez said. “Generations of readers saw these photos in their daily newspaper each morning, and now, future generations will continue to be able to study and appreciate the insight they provide into the history of our city, state, nation and world.”

Black and white image of seven people stranded on a rooftop amid a flooded street, being rescued by a large boat of 13 men.
Rescuers arrive at the Hoblitzell home during flooding in Louisville. By George Bailey, The Courier-Journal. 1937

“This gift will allow the Courier Journal to retain the legacy of our work through this collection of historic photographs,” said Courier Journal Editor Mary Irby-Jones. “It is important for us to preserve and share our work with others so our community can learn about the history of Louisville as captured through our photographers in the field for more than 150 years.  The Courier Journal is honored to entrust this priceless archive to the care of the University of Louisville for the purpose of making the collection available to the community for research and scholarship.”

“For most of a decade, it has been our dream to honor our father by finding a permanent, public home for the Courier Journal’s photographic collection,” said Emily and Molly Bingham. “This visual treasure is a testament to his dedication to high quality journalism, his passion for photography, his love of archives and his commitment to public access to information. He is up there somewhere today, smiling and joyfully twirling his trademark handlebar mustache.”

Black and white photo of three people, two young girls and a middle-aged woman standing amid rubble. One young girl inspects a dress while the younger girl cries. The woman's hand is to her forehead.
Mrs. Barbara Jaggers stands stunned in the remains of her two-story house on Stannye Dr. in the Northfield subdivison. Her youngest daughter, Leigh Ann, age 7, cries in disbelief. Jaggers and her three daughters were downtown when the tornado hit. her husband, Gene was out of town. By Larry Spitzer, The Courier-Journal. April 4, 1974.

About the Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-Journal Photo Collection

The collection, consisting of images created by the photo department that served both the Courier Journal and the afternoon Louisville Times newspapers, chronicles daily happenings and major events from approximately the mid-1930s to the early 2000s when digital photography began to replace the use of film to capture images. The collection doubles the size of UofL’s photo holdings. It might have dated back further, but the Great Flood of 1937 destroyed much of the newspaper’s photo and negative library.

“The collection chronicles the civil rights movement, World War II, the Kentucky Derby through the years, presidential visits, changes in the built environment, and numerous public appearances and behind-the-scenes images of world leaders and celebrities,” said Archives and Special Collections Director Carrie Daniels. “Basically, all of the changes happening within our country were captured in these photographs.”

“It’s an incredible collection,” Elizabeth Reilly, photo archivist, said, “and with any large-scale acquisition like this, it will take years to process, organize and add information to the collection, to make images discoverable and usable by the public.

“A small portion of the collection will be available online in the near future, and, as we process the amazing imagery it contains, we will be opening up bigger and bigger parts of the collection to the public, making it accessible to everyone who wants to see it.”

Reilly credited Barry Bingham Jr., the third and last Bingham family member to serve as the paper’s publisher, for his devotion to setting high standards for the photography his newspaper published. The Courier Journal won two Pulitzer Prizes for photojournalism during his tenure.

Black and white image of three men in a  boxing ring, one a white man leaning back in apprehension, another a white man bending down after having been struck, and a tall black man in boxing gloves.
Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) and referee Don Asbury watched as LaMar Clark sank to the canvas for the second time in the first round of their heavyweight fight at Louisville’s Freedom Hall. Clay went on to knockout Clark in the second round of the eight-round match. By Robert Steinau, The Courier-Journal. April 19, 1961

“He was a huge supporter of high-quality photojournalism,” Reilly said. “He grew and improved the quality of photography in the newspaper through investments, hiring talented photojournalists, and giving them time and travel budget to capture visual information beyond the news moment or press release.  That commitment to quality is reflected in the collection and adds to its national significance.”

Daniels cited the increase in scholarship and creative potential that the collection will bring to UofL. “Our Photographic Archives already contain 2-3 million historical, documentary and fine art images dating from the 19th century to today that capture faces, buildings, landscapes and events from around the world, with a focus on Louisville and Kentucky. These images have appeared in scholarly or artistic work, including filmmaker Ken Burns’s documentaries, Dustbowl, Prohibition and Baseball. This dramatically increases our ability to provide images that everyone, including scholars and artists, will be able to use going forward, and we are very excited about that.”

The Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-JournalPhoto Collection Endowment is seeking additional contributions to support the organization, digitization, library services and public programming for this remarkable resource.

To make a contribution or for more information, contact Denise Bohn, denise.bohn@louisville.edu.


Open Educational Resources and Student Success

Studies have shown that students will forgo buying a textbook due to its price even while acknowledging that they will do worse in the class without their own copy. With hardcopy textbooks costing as much as $400 with averages running between $80 and $150, many students feel financially pressured to not purchase the text.

Open Educational Resources (OER) can help students succeed by reducing their costs and improving their access to course materials. OER are freely available material and the availability of them is growing as faculty recognize the advantages to students and their financial considerations in whether to buy textbooks, or indeed, to complete their degrees.

In order help faculty learn about OER, the University Libraries have created a new website, https://library.louisville.edu/oer/, that provides information on what OER are, how to find them, and how to implement them.

Open Educational Resources site home page
Open Educational Resources site

The Defining OER section introduces what OER are and how they benefit student learning.

The Finding OER section includes search options for OER metafinders and library e-books (which are available at no additional cost to UofL students, staff, and faculty). On the OER by Subject tab, faculty can link to individual guides for specific subjects which provide highlight available materials. The Evaluating OER tab provides a suggested list of questions faculty should ask when determining whether a particular OER will work for their class.

The Implementing OER section provides information on creating and adapting OER, creative commons licensing, and contact information for consultation services with our OER Librarian.

We invite you to explore the site and start thinking about how you could use OER to improve student success.

Sources

Richard, Brendan, Dean Cleavenger, and Valerie A. Storey. “The Buy-In: A Qualitative Investigation of the Textbook Purchase Decision.” Journal of Higher Education Theory & Practice 14, no. 3 (2014): 20-31.

“Average Cost of College Textbooks.” Updated August 12, 2021, accessed May 13, 2022, https://educationdata.org/average-cost-of-college-textbooks.


Awards Honor University Libraries Employees

Three University Libraries employees have been honored with awards for outstanding performance and merit, and for contributions to the Louisville community.

John Burton, Acquisitions Specialist with Technical Services won the University of Louisville’s annual Outstanding Performance Award honoring exceptional service in staff.  Burton has worked for the Libraries for over 30 years, having begun as a libraries student assistant, and later with Technical Services, and has experienced first-hand the transformation of the library profession and its services, including the transition from an analog card catalog to digitized online collections. As Acquisitions Specialist, Burton is in charge of finding and evaluating items to add to the Libraries’ physical and digital collections.

Photo of John Burton
John Burton

The award comes with a cash award of $1,000, an acrylic plaque, and public mention on the University website and UofL Today.

Fannie Cox, Outreach and Reference Librarian, has been chosen for the University of Louisville Distinguished Faculty Award, which recognizes “the excellent service of the University of Louisville faculty and the significant impact that service has on the university and beyond.” The awards are given annually to faculty for exceptional service in five categories: service to UofL; service to the profession; service to the community, the commonwealth and/or the region; national/international service; career of service.

Picture of Fannie Cox with award.
Fannie Cox (photo by Rob Detmering)

As community outreach and reference librarian, Cox has forged relationships with numerous organizations and individuals working to help under-served communities in Louisville, particularly in the West End. She leads the Outreach Program within the Libraries, which offers instructional support to community members, helping them develop informational literacy and critical thinking skills. She has been with the Libraries for 22 years.

Cox and Burton were honored at the 2022 Faculty and Staff Excellence Awards Reception on Monday, April 18 in the Student Activities Center ballroom.

Additionally, Weiling Liu, Head of Office of Libraries Technology, was one of five individuals selected to receive the Jewish Family and Career ServicesMOSAIC (Multicultural Opportunities for Success and Achievement In our Community) Award.  The MOSAIC Awards “honor immigrants and refugees from around the globe who have made significant contributions in their professions to the Louisville community.” The 2022 nominations were open to individuals who, “regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, or country of origin, have fulfilled their dreams of self-sufficiency and made an impact in our community” according to Liu’s award letter.

Photo of Weiling Liu
Weiling Liu

Liu has worked with the Libraries for 23 years. As the Head of OLT, she manages and directs a department responsible for all aspects of library technology systems and libraries technical support. In her history with the University Libraries, she oversaw the migration of the library catalog system and the implementation of Ekstrom Library’s noted Robot Retrieval System. She has been a member of state, national and international library professional associations.  In addition, she is a life member of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), a non-profit international organization of librarians. Professor Liu also serves on the Association of Chinese Americans in Kentuckiana (ACAK) board and was president from 2018-2021.

The MOSAIC award ceremony and dinner will take place on Thursday, May 26, 2022 at the Muhammad Ali Center in downtown Louisville. In addition to Liu, this year’s award winners are Dr. Faten Abdullah, Jose Neil Donis, Dr. Juan Gustavo Polo, and Frank Schwartz.


Louisville history of racial oppression and activism revealed in new online resource

By Rebecca Pattillo

University of Louisville’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC) has published a new resource, Uncovering Racial Logics: Louisville’s History of Racial Oppression and Activism, a website that provides access to documents, oral histories, photographs and other materials that tell the story of Louisville’s history of racial oppression and activism.

The site is focused on education, policing and housing, “areas in which we see institutional racism at work, producing unequal access to resources, freedoms, and opportunities as part of ongoing U.S. racial stratification,” according to the site’s introduction. Funded by the Cooperative Consortium for Transdisciplinary Social Justice Research (CCTSJR) and the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, the collaborative project was created by faculty members across multiple departments for an interdisciplinary look at the “racial logics” of Louisville via primary source materials housed in ASC.

A group of Black and white women standing in front of a bus, 21 July 1966. Source: R_18909, Royal Photo Company Collection, 1982.03, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
A group of Black and white women standing in front of a bus, 21 July 1966. Source: R_18909, Royal Photo Company Collection, 1982.03, Photographic Archives, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

Dr. Carrie Mott, UofL Assistant Professor of Geographic and Environmental Sciences and one of the site’s creators, said the goal of the project was to provide access to useful information to anyone interested in learning about Louisville’s history around racial justice.

“We also wanted to provide a tool that would help people see the amazing archival resources housed at ASC,” said Mott.  “From prior research and teaching with archives at UofL, I knew of the wealth of resources we have here at UofL. But we recognized many people on campus as well as in the larger Louisville community do not understand how to use archival resources, why they might be useful, or know how to access them. The website was an opportunity to provide some resources in terms of actual scanned documents, but also to help people learn that UofL has a lot more where that came from for research on Louisville’s racial history.”

Rebecca Pattillo, ASC Metadata Librarian and site co-creator, said “Working on this project allowed ASC to make some of our materials available digitally. The site also directs visitors to our robust online digital collections, where they can explore some of the materials referenced in greater depth.”

“One misconception about the archives is that they are only available to UofL affiliated people, when actually we are open to anyone in the community,” said Pattillo.

The site features scanned archival documents including pamphlets, newspaper clippings, oral histories, correspondence, and photographs, with contextual and historical information about each document and the larger collection to which it belongs. In addition to scanned documents, the site also highlights oral histories, story maps, and other resources addressing Louisville’s racial history. 

"Office of Black Affairs bulletin 1969-1970", Reference file: Office of Black Affairs, Archives and Special Collections
“Office of Black Affairs bulletin 1969-1970,” Reference file: Office of Black Affairs, Archives and Special Collections

Site users may explore the topic of both secondary and higher education in Louisville to learn about the push for equal pay among Black and white teachers in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the city’s move to desegregate schools via court-ordered busing in the mid-1970s, integration of the University of Louisville in the 1950s, and the founding of the Black Student Union and the Department of Black Affairs in the late 1960s. In addition, learn about Simmons University, one of Kentucky’s two HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), and Louisville Municipal College, the only Black liberal arts college in the state which operated from 1931 through 1951, when it merged with a newly integrated UofL.

Another topic explored is the history of policing and police violence throughout the city. An example is the story of Fred J. Harris, a Black man who lost an eye after being beaten by police in 1979, and the work of the Kentucky Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression to seek justice for Harris by demanding accountability from the police force.

Progress in Education (PIE) Records, (Box 3, Folder 3 "Statewide March on Frankfort, July 2, 1976"), 
Archives and Special Collections, University of Louisville.
Progress in Education (PIE) Records, (Box 3, Folder 3 “Statewide March on Frankfort, July 2, 1976”), Archives and Special Collections, University of Louisville.

Housing and Urban Renewal is another focus of the Uncovering Racial Logics project. Select archival materials highlight the narrative of Louisville’s history of racist housing policies and practices, including the construction of racially segregated federal public housing projects in the aftermath of the destruction of neighborhoods and displacement of communities via Urban Renewal. These materials also reveal resistance to and organizing among the Black community and white allies to fight against racist housing policies and discriminatory practices. One such well known housing project is Beecher Terrace, which is explored via the papers of its long-time manager, Earl Pruitt.

Rounding out the project is an extensive, albeit not exhaustive, list of resources for further research. You can explore interactive maps that detail the history of racism within city planning and zoning, as well as redlining within Louisville. In addition is a list of community resources that highlight local organizations that work to empower and improve life for Louisville’s diverse citizens. Also included is a list of UofL Resourcesthathighlights on-campus organizations and committees that work towards racial and social justice, as well as minority affinity groups.

This project was created by Carrie Mott, Rebecca Pattillo, Melanie Gast, Anna Browne Rebiero, Joy Hart, Kelly Kinahan, and Catherine Fosl, with additional assistance from undergraduate and graduate research assistants Cat Alexander, Elizabeth Frazier, and Ben Harlan. Additional technical assistance was provided by Cassidy Meurer and Terri Holtze. Special thanks goes to UofL’s Cooperative Consortium for Transdisciplinary Social Justice Research (CCTSJR) and Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research (ABI) for funding and supporting this work, as well as our community partners.

Archives and Special Collections collects, organizes, preserves, and makes available for research rare and unique primary and secondary source material, particularly relating to the history and cultural heritage of Louisville, Kentucky and the surrounding region, as well as serving as the official memory of the University of Louisville.


How to reserve a room in our libraries

Curious about how to reserve a room in one of our libraries? It’s easy!

First, navigate to the University Libraries website: library.louisville.edu/home.

Libraries website home page. In the right-hand column is the box titled Reserve a Room.

Next, click on the orange “Reserve a Room” box in the right hand column. This page should come up:

Landing page for room reservations. Shows room descriptions and a limit to box.

Then choose the library where you would like to reserve a room. Or if you prefer, you can limit your choices by room type: auditoriums, conference rooms, group study rooms, or instruction labs.

Small box with inverted white text on black backdrop titled "Limit To"

Some rooms are only available to be reserved by faculty or staff. Others are also open to students.

Descriptions of rooms may include a list of equipment and technology available within the space. For example, Art Library’s Room 102C includes:

  • Movable furniture
  • Control panel to turn on/off system
  • 70″ mounted television monitor
  • Mac computer 
  • Web conferencing camera
  • CD/DVD player
  • Screen mirroring software compatible with laptops, phones, and tablets
  • Wireless keyboard and mouse
  • Freestanding podium
  • External speakers
  • Mobile whiteboard and markers
Shows image of Art Library's Room 102C, which may be reserved. Gray carpet, six tables with two chairs each, all modular, and a large video screen. Art on the walls.
The Art Library’s Room 102C

Please remember to visit each library’s policies (Ekstrom; Kornhauser; Art; Music). Some rooms have specific policies which are included in the room description.


Libraries Dean Fox Named Treasurer of ARL

University of Louisville Libraries Dean Bob Fox has been elected treasurer for the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). He will serve a three-year term, and will chair the group’s finance committee.

Dean Fox became UofL’s member representative to ARL in 2011 and joined the ARL Board and its finance committee in 2018; he has been a member of the audit committee since its founding in 2019. He had served as interim treasurer since August.

Fox has served as Dean of the University Libraries since 2011. Since that time, and prior to his tenure with UofL, he has served in a number of leadership positions with professional and industry organizations.

Image of Libraries Dean Bob Fox standing in front of cardinal bird graphic on the third floor of Ekstrom Library.

In addition to his ARL board service, Fox has served on several ARL committees and working groups since he became a member representative in 2011, including the Statistics and Assessment Committee/Research and Analytics Committee (2012, chair 2013–2016); the Libraries That Learn Design Team (2015–2016); and the ARL Academy Advisory Committee (2018–2019). Fox was an ARL Leadership Fellow in 2009–2010. 

UofL Libraries became members of ARL in 2002.

About the Association of Research Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 125 research libraries in Canada and the US whose mission is to advance research, learning, and scholarly communication. The Association fosters the open exchange of ideas and expertise; advances diversity, equity, and inclusion; and pursues advocacy and public policy efforts that reflect the values of the library, scholarly, and higher education communities. ARL forges partnerships and catalyzes the collective efforts of research libraries to enable knowledge creation and to achieve enduring and barrier-free access to information. ARL is on the web at ARL.org.


ThinkIR Highlights BIPOC Scholarship

Part of Open Access involves building structural equity in OA venues. To this end, the Libraries have created The Collective, an initiative to uplift BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) faculty and staff at UofL by highlighting their research and providing open-access to BIPOC-produced scholarship on ThinkIR, the University’s digital institutional repository. 

From Undergraduate Teaching Faculty: The HERI Faculty Survey 2016–2017 (www.heri.ucla.edu) © 2019

Hosted and managed by the University Libraries, ThinkIR promotes genuine open access and sustainable scholarship by making the work of UofL researchers freely available to a global audience without requiring costly and unsustainable access to journal subscriptions. “The Collective” was initiated in response to research showing that faculty who identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or people of color are underrepresented and marginalized in academia. According to the Higher Education Research Institute’s 2016-2017 faculty survey, there were large gaps between white and BIPOC scholars  feeling a need to work harder to be perceived as a legitimate scholar. “Substantially more Black (72.2%), Asian (70.7%), Latino/a (70.6%), and Native American (66.7%) faculty perceived a need to work harder than their peers to gain legitimacy compared to just 46.8% of White faculty who felt similarly.”

By featuring a BIPOC scholars research collection in our institutional repository, we hope to encourage scholars of all disciplines to intentionally seek out the research and scholarship of their colleagues of color.

Helpful Links and Resources

Home – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville 

BIPOC Scholars – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville

HERI-FAC2017-monograph.pdf (ucla.edu)


Celebrating International Open Access Week

International Open Access Week (IOAW), held this year from October 25-21, advocates for the right to use and access knowledge freely and without subscription and copyright limitations. Every year, IOAW attempts to raise awareness of the potential disparities that arise when some scholarship is made more exclusive and less accessible to the public. 

The theme for this year’s IOAW is “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.” This theme was created to align with the recently released UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science:

Open Science should embrace a diversity of knowledge, practices, workflows, languages, research outputs and research topics that support the needs and epistemic pluralism of the scientific community as a whole, diverse research communities and scholars, as well as the wider public and knowledge holders beyond the traditional scientific community, including Indigenous Peoples and local communities, and social actors from different countries and regions, as appropriate. (UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, Page 7)

Often large publishers force academics to sign contracts limiting publication of their work to a single journal, and then charge high subscription fees for access to the work. This creates a disparity in who can access the knowledge. 

ThinkIR, UofL’s Digital Institutional Repository, offers an online venue for sharing the work of our researchers, making it free, open, and accessible to a wide audience. There are no paywalls, no copyright contracts. ThinkIR is managed and hosted by the University Libraries. 

Helpful Links and Resources

Home – ThinkIR – UofL Libraries at University of Louisville 

2021 Open Access Week Theme to be “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity” – Open Access Week


Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month

October is National Medical Librarians Month and an opportunity to celebrate Kornhauser Health Sciences Library and Rowntree Library employees who continue to provide specialized library support to UofL physicians, faculty, staff, and students across the health sciences disciplines. This year, the focus is on health equity.

Medical librarians provide a pivotal role in helping eliminate disparities in health outcomes. Kornhauser and Rowntree librarians and staff frequently assist researchers in finding information on issues related to health equity, from disparities in pancreatic cancer outcomes experienced by African Americans to cross-cultural differences in palliative care preferences.

When UofL physicians or medical personnel have questions that require specialized medical research, they will reach out to our librarians who will quickly respond with the most up-to-date information. This enables physicians to make the best decisions related to patient care, a crucial step in ensuring health equity. None of the research is behind a paywall or requires a special fee for service. 

In addition to providing support for specific research questions, the librarians on the health sciences campus work to offer broad access to resources related to health equity issues. Earlier this year, Kornhauser expanded its collections to broaden DEI-related titles and the clinical librarian team created a Diversity Resources Hub for resources related to the social determinants of health, health disparities, cultural competence, consumer health resources, and more.

Social factors and equity concerns are involved in all aspects of healthcare, and the medical librarians at Kornhauser and Rowntree are glad to do their part to help researchers, clinicians, and students navigate these important issues.

To celebrate Health Literacy Awareness Month, Kornhauser will present a webinar on October 21 from noon-1 p.m. titled “Health Literacy: Your Role as a Healthcare Professional.”  Kornhauser Clinical Librarian Dani LaPreze will discuss how healthcare providers can help their patients better understand medical information, how providers can improve communication through cultural awareness and competence. She will also describe the resources that are available for both providers and patients. A Q&A will follow. To register, visit: https://library.louisville.edu/kornhauser/health-literacy-webinar.