Contemporary Classical Collection of Dr. Jon Rieger Donated to Music Library

UofL Sociology professor Dr. Jon Rieger, who died in 2020 at age 83, distinguished himself in many areas beyond a remarkable 60-year academic career, including as a pioneer in visual sociology, as a US Navy captain, as a board member and patron of Louisville community and arts organizations, and as the author of a seminal bodybuilding manual.

Beyond these achievements and closer to the hearts of the local artistic community was Rieger’s strong impact on their creative work and lives. He functioned as a mentor, sounding board, supporter, caring critic, and advocate for many local musicians, photographers, painters and dancers. His obituary captures the love and respect they had for a man passionately devoted to fine art in its multi-varied forms.

One of Rieger’s strong, lifelong passions was contemporary classical music, which led him to amass a vast collection of recordings in various formats. Some are extremely rare, perhaps singular, from such locations as Russia, China, Eastern Europe, and the Americas, many gathered abroad during his years of active duty in the Navy.

Image of shelves full of cds and albums.
Photo by James Procell

Due to Rieger’s generosity and the University Libraries great fortune, these recordings are now publicly available at UofL’s Music Library. The new Jon Rieger Collection contains around 7,000 recordings (circa 4,000 LPs, 2,500 CDs and some 200 cassettes). Due to the size of the collection, the library’s process of cataloging is ongoing, but all recordings are available for borrowing or enjoying on site.

“Many of the recordings were collected while he traveled the world in the Navy and sought out recordings from other countries,” said Music Library Director James Procell. “So what you see in this collection are some extremely rare recordings, many of which were never commercially available in the US. He ordered pressings of particular broadcasts he encountered on the BBC, Radio Netherlands or on other international stations, so it’s possible these are the only recordings.”

A true audiophile, Rieger created a sophisticated sound environment in his home with two massive speakers for high-quality listening, said Procell. “He enjoyed sharing this experience with others and would often invite friends over for listening sessions and parties.”

In 2015 after Procell became Music Library director, Rieger reached out to him to arrange the library’s acquisition of his collection “when he was done with it” (i.e. upon his death). He wanted it to go to UofL, but remain separate from the Library’s main holdings.

“Typically, we can’t do that for most individual donors, but since Rieger’s collection is so unique and distinguished and expansive, we agreed to create a separate area for it. Not many people collect these types of sound recordings anymore, or have these big physical collections, so this is particularly special.” 

Procell also plans to create a separate listening area with comfortable seating and headphones, so that students, faculty, researchers and the public can come and enjoy the music and browse the stacks at their leisure. The Music Library will organize the collection by record label, following Rieger’s own printed catalog of works and method of organization, which he updated until 2018.

“Anyone can check out the albums even though not all of them are cataloged as yet,” said Procell. “All are browse-able and on the shelves.”

Procell has been aided in his curation of Rieger’s collection by Louisville cellist, songwriter, and storyteller Ben Sollee.  In Rieger’s obituary, Sollee says that Rieger “built a family around his love of the arts . . . that he affectionately coined the ‘Tin Ear Society.’ This expansive family of dancers, musicians, composers, photographers, writers, visual artists and creatives were all connected by his mentorship, patronage, and radically honest critiques of our work. He helped us make better and more meaningful art. And, importantly, he never missed an opportunity to get us all together to enjoy Louisville’s bounty of performances. He taught us all, as both a sociologist and Big Brother, that great art is the product of and the fuel that grows thriving communities.”

“Jon was a huge supporter of the arts,” said Procell. “He financially supported causes he thought were important, including various arts organizations, and individual artists, photographers, dancers and musicians.”

“He was a very good friend of the Music Library and the School of Music and is missed by everyone here that knew him.”


UofL Photo Archives receives full collection of Courier Journal photography

A treasure trove of roughly three million images have been donated to UofL’s Photo Archives by current and former owners of Louisville’s Courier Journal newspaper.

The Courier Journal – winner of 11 Pulitzer Prizes throughout its 154-year history – and its parent company Gannett have transferred its library of photographs and negatives to UofL Archives and Special Collections. Many of the images are iconic and capture important historical moments in the last century.

A black and white photo of a white child sitting in an empty school room desk shaking hands with a black child standing next to his desk.
At Greenwood Elementary, Mark Stewart, 8, seated, exchanged introductions with a new classmate, Darrel Hughes, also 8. The photo of the two young men shaking hands became the iconic image from Louisville’s days of forced busing to integrate teh city’s public school system. By Michael Coers, The Courier-Journal. Sept. 3, 1975

Members of Louisville’s Bingham family, which owned the newspaper from 1918 to 1986, have made a separate donation to support the collection, including preserving it, preparing it for use by the public, and developing programming to enable the public to engage with it.

Their combined generosity is creating the Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-Journal Photo Collection, a unique journalistic collection of local, state and national importance.

Black and white photo of four soldiers surrounding another injured soldier.
Soldiers in the heat of battle during the Vietnam War try to help a fallen comrade. By Bill Strode, The Courier-Journal. 1965

“We are incredibly grateful to the Courier Journal, Gannett, Emily Bingham, Molly Bingham and the rest of the Bingham family for making this historic gift possible,” UofL President Lori Gonzalez said. “Generations of readers saw these photos in their daily newspaper each morning, and now, future generations will continue to be able to study and appreciate the insight they provide into the history of our city, state, nation and world.”

Black and white image of seven people stranded on a rooftop amid a flooded street, being rescued by a large boat of 13 men.
Rescuers arrive at the Hoblitzell home during flooding in Louisville. By George Bailey, The Courier-Journal. 1937

“This gift will allow the Courier Journal to retain the legacy of our work through this collection of historic photographs,” said Courier Journal Editor Mary Irby-Jones. “It is important for us to preserve and share our work with others so our community can learn about the history of Louisville as captured through our photographers in the field for more than 150 years.  The Courier Journal is honored to entrust this priceless archive to the care of the University of Louisville for the purpose of making the collection available to the community for research and scholarship.”

“For most of a decade, it has been our dream to honor our father by finding a permanent, public home for the Courier Journal’s photographic collection,” said Emily and Molly Bingham. “This visual treasure is a testament to his dedication to high quality journalism, his passion for photography, his love of archives and his commitment to public access to information. He is up there somewhere today, smiling and joyfully twirling his trademark handlebar mustache.”

Black and white photo of three people, two young girls and a middle-aged woman standing amid rubble. One young girl inspects a dress while the younger girl cries. The woman's hand is to her forehead.
Mrs. Barbara Jaggers stands stunned in the remains of her two-story house on Stannye Dr. in the Northfield subdivison. Her youngest daughter, Leigh Ann, age 7, cries in disbelief. Jaggers and her three daughters were downtown when the tornado hit. her husband, Gene was out of town. By Larry Spitzer, The Courier-Journal. April 4, 1974.

About the Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-Journal Photo Collection

The collection, consisting of images created by the photo department that served both the Courier Journal and the afternoon Louisville Times newspapers, chronicles daily happenings and major events from approximately the mid-1930s to the early 2000s when digital photography began to replace the use of film to capture images. The collection doubles the size of UofL’s photo holdings. It might have dated back further, but the Great Flood of 1937 destroyed much of the newspaper’s photo and negative library.

“The collection chronicles the civil rights movement, World War II, the Kentucky Derby through the years, presidential visits, changes in the built environment, and numerous public appearances and behind-the-scenes images of world leaders and celebrities,” said Archives and Special Collections Director Carrie Daniels. “Basically, all of the changes happening within our country were captured in these photographs.”

“It’s an incredible collection,” Elizabeth Reilly, photo archivist, said, “and with any large-scale acquisition like this, it will take years to process, organize and add information to the collection, to make images discoverable and usable by the public.

“A small portion of the collection will be available online in the near future, and, as we process the amazing imagery it contains, we will be opening up bigger and bigger parts of the collection to the public, making it accessible to everyone who wants to see it.”

Reilly credited Barry Bingham Jr., the third and last Bingham family member to serve as the paper’s publisher, for his devotion to setting high standards for the photography his newspaper published. The Courier Journal won two Pulitzer Prizes for photojournalism during his tenure.

Black and white image of three men in a  boxing ring, one a white man leaning back in apprehension, another a white man bending down after having been struck, and a tall black man in boxing gloves.
Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) and referee Don Asbury watched as LaMar Clark sank to the canvas for the second time in the first round of their heavyweight fight at Louisville’s Freedom Hall. Clay went on to knockout Clark in the second round of the eight-round match. By Robert Steinau, The Courier-Journal. April 19, 1961

“He was a huge supporter of high-quality photojournalism,” Reilly said. “He grew and improved the quality of photography in the newspaper through investments, hiring talented photojournalists, and giving them time and travel budget to capture visual information beyond the news moment or press release.  That commitment to quality is reflected in the collection and adds to its national significance.”

Daniels cited the increase in scholarship and creative potential that the collection will bring to UofL. “Our Photographic Archives already contain 2-3 million historical, documentary and fine art images dating from the 19th century to today that capture faces, buildings, landscapes and events from around the world, with a focus on Louisville and Kentucky. These images have appeared in scholarly or artistic work, including filmmaker Ken Burns’s documentaries, Dustbowl, Prohibition and Baseball. This dramatically increases our ability to provide images that everyone, including scholars and artists, will be able to use going forward, and we are very excited about that.”

The Barry Bingham Jr. Courier-JournalPhoto Collection Endowment is seeking additional contributions to support the organization, digitization, library services and public programming for this remarkable resource.

To make a contribution or for more information, contact Denise Bohn, denise.bohn@louisville.edu.


Archives & Special Collections celebrates Julius Friedman with Exhibit and Gallery Dedication

Early posters and other works by internationally renowned Louisville artist Julius Friedman are featured in the exhibit Graphic Pioneer: The Early Poster Designs of Julius Friedman, 1965-1980, hosted by Photographic Archives, part of UofL’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC). The exhibit opened with a reception on July 14 featuring the dedication and renaming of the Photographic Archives gallery in Friedman’s honor.

Image of man cut in half and duplicated in reverse beneath layers of yellow graduating to orange in the shape of butterfly wings. A graphic design of Friedman's.
The exhibit announcement features a 1973 graphic work by Friedman promoting the Center for Photographic Studies.

Friedman’s sister, Carol Abrams, donated the bulk of his artistic works to the Photographic Archives after his passing in 2017. Ms. Abrams states, “Julius loved to mentor students and fellow artists. In giving his work to the Archives and Special Collections, students can learn from his work.” Ms. Abrams also generously provided support to renovate the gallery, enhance storage for ASC’s photographic holdings, including Friedman’s work, and prepare the collection for research by the community. This preparatory work is ongoing, but the full collection is expected to be open to the public in 2023.

Shown are five people, four women and one man, holding a large pair of scissors and surrounded by balloons.
ASC Director Carrie Daniels, Libraries Dean Bob Fox, Carol Friedman Abrams, Archivist Elizabeth Reilly and UofL President Lori Gonzalez cut the ribbon to open the newly named Julius Friedman Gallery.

Beloved by the local arts community, Friedman was also highly regarded among international audiences. Perhaps best known for the posters “Fresh Paint” and “Toe on Egg,” Friedman created posters and other graphic works for a broad range of clients. Outside of his design work, Friedman created his own artwork through photography – often printing on unique surfaces like metals and fabrics – as well as sculpture, furniture design, collage, book art, and collaborative video.  While this exhibit focuses on his early posters, the collection includes this broad range of media and formats.

“Julius Friedman was such a significant figure in our local arts scene,” said Carrie Daniels, Director of ASC. “We are delighted to serve as the home of his archive, and to present a slice of it to the community in this exhibition.”

“Fresh Paint” is one of Friedman’s most recognized posters. 1978. By Julius Friedman and Nathan Felde.

Friedman was a graphic design alumnus of UofL and had a decades-long relationship with the University Libraries. His work frequently appeared in ASC exhibits, including a 2012 celebration of Photographic Archives’ 50th Anniversary, which featured Friedman’s photographic capture of a ballerina in mid-swirl. Friedman’s close friend, former Art Library Director Gail Gilbert, inspired one of Friedman’s later efforts, a project titled The Book.  Gilbert suggested that Friedman create works of art from old books that otherwise would have been thrown away, and he ran with the project, taking old books, tearing them, twisting them, boring into them, reconstituting them and creating art. The Book consists of 130 photographs of that art.

Promotional poster for D.W. Griffith Film Series showing graphic design of gray transparent photographs of a man's, film director Francois Truffaut's face duplicated in horizontal rows. In the middle is a row of yellow photographs showing the man's full face at the top and just the lower half of his face in duplicate below.
Truffaut poster, one of a group of posters for the D.W. Griffith Film Series. 1976. By Julius Friedman and Nathan Felde.

Among ASC’s Oral History Center (ohc.library.louisville.edu) digital offerings are two recordings of conversations between Abrams and ASC archivist and local historian Tom Owen. In them, Abrams discusses her memories of growing up with Julius, her older brother and only sibling, and how she came to work alongside him in his studio and then gallery to exhibit and sell his work commercially. Abrams recounts observing her brother’s talent burgeoning in childhood and watching him become successful as an adult. She also talks about establishing a nonprofit foundation in her brother’s name to help young people pursue academic degrees in the arts, the Julius Friedman Foundation (juliusfriedman.org).

The exhibition will run through December 16 in the Julius Friedman Gallery, on the lower level of Ekstrom Library. For more information, contact Elizabeth Reilly (502 852-8730; elizabeth.reilly@louisville.edu).


Libraries hire new project archivist for Julius Friedman collection

A trove of work by Louisville artist Julius Friedman (1943-2017), including a diverse mix of graphic design, books, commercial art, and photography, was recently donated to University of Louisville’s Archives and Special Collections (ASC), by Friedman’s sister, Louisville philanthropist Carol Abrams.

And now Friedman’s work will soon be preserved, organized, cataloged and available for public viewing thanks to additional funding from Abrams which allows ASC to hire a project archivist.

Poster of images associated with boys, a baseball, model airplane, string, toys, a whistle, junior safety patrol button, etc.
Boys Will Be Boys poster, created for Buckeye Boys Ranch in Grove City, Ohio, a home for troubled boys. Copies of the poster were sold to benefit the ranch. 

“It’s a rich and unique group of materials and there are so many different types,” said Haley-Marie Ellegood, who will serve a one-year term as archivist for the Julius Friedman Collection. “He worked with widely different formats – there is graphic design, posters, photography, and at the end of his career he got into bookmaking. He was moving into video production when he died.”

A recent Indiana University graduate with a Master of Library Science, Ellegood specialized in archives and records management and worked in the IU Archives. In addition to researching, cataloging, and preserving the collection, Ellegood will help select items for an exhibit of Friedman’s works to be held in mid-July in ASC’s gallery.

Image of book with colorful animals, a green fox, gray turtle, orange warthog, purple rabbit and brown chipmunk facing each other in a circle.
The Day the Animals Lost Their True Colors. Published in 2001 by the Brain Injury Association of Kentucky Press, this book was one of many books designed by Friedman. 

“He really loved working for nonprofit groups and he mostly worked for free,” said Ellegood. “He wasn’t really into making money, but he created annual reports for corporations and was able to charge a fair fee for it. That type of payment apparently funded his work for nonprofits.”

Brown Foreman Annual Report 1992
1992 Brown-Forman Corporation Annual Report. Friedman’s first B-F annual report, named a bronze winner for photography by Financial World magazine. 

Friedman was well known for his commercial photography, graphic design, and iconic posters, including “Fresh Paint”; “Ballerina Toe on Egg” for the Louisville Ballet; and “Ice Cream in French Horn” for the Louisville Orchestra.

In addition to many of Friedman’s iconic posters, the collection includes much of his photography, and graphic design for menus, postcards, stationery, event programs, and flyers. Other materials include some of his written work, including a few notebooks and some correspondence. ASC has had a relationship with Friedman going back decades. Although the Filson Historical Society has a small collection of Friedman’s art, ASC holds the largest part of the collection.

Four photographs of flowers at a high resolution and up close.
Photographs of flowers printed on Masonite. Friedman took pictures of everything, but he seems to have especially enjoyed taking pictures of nature. Later in his career he experimented with printing photos on different types of materials such as Masonite and aluminum. 

Ellegood says her love of archival work grew out of her love of history, her subject major as an undergraduate. “I love learning about important people in historic places and from historic times. And I enjoy making information accessible to people, so they can appreciate it.”

Image of young woman with dark hair.
Haley-Marie Ellegood

Processing Friedman’s collection is an exciting first professional project after graduate school for Ellegood. “His art really makes you think about what’s going on, it’s not what you would expect. You wouldn’t expect a ballerina to balance on an egg. It challenges your preconceived notions.”


The Susan and William Yarmuth Jewish Studies Reading Room Opens in Ekstrom Library

To honor the local Jewish community and provide special presentation, reflection and quiet study space for the UofL campus, The Susan and William Yarmuth Jewish Studies Reading Room officially opened on Ekstrom Library’s 3rd Floor with a ceremony on March 20. 

The new space showcases the Libraries’ Jewish Studies collection, and features the Deborah and Rabbi Robert Slosberg Collection, which consists of the personal library the couple amassed over decades of serving and leading Jewish congregations.

Shown are Libraries Dean Bob Fox, UofL President Lori Gonzalez, William Yarmuth, Sue Yarmuth, Deborah Slosberg and Rabbi Slossberg standing before a red ribbon prior to cutting it at a ribbon cutting ceremony to open the new Jewish Studies Reading Room.

Libraries Dean Bob Fox, UofL President Lori Gonzalez, William Yarmuth, Sue Yarmuth, Deborah Slosberg and Rabbi Slossberg at a ribbon cutting ceremony to open the new Jewish Studies Reading Room.

“We are excited to open the new Jewish Studies Reading Room and are grateful for the generous donations that allowed us to fully complete the room and open it to the public,” said Libraries Dean Bob Fox. “We hope that the room will serve to inspire future generations of scholars to greater success.”

The ribbon-cutting ceremony and room dedication included remarks from Interim President Lori Gonzalez, William and Susan Yarmuth, Rabbi Slosberg and Libraries Dean Fox before closing with a mezuzah dedication. A mezuzah is a small scroll inscribed with prayers and verses from the Torah and attached in a case near the opening of a home or building as a sign of faith as a constant reminder of God’s presence. As instructed in the Torah, Jews will often touch the mezuzah as they go through the door. In the Yarmuth Reading Room, it is located on the wall to the right upon entry. 

The 2,600-square-foot space features floor-to-ceiling windows and offers one of the most scenic views on campus. Along with the Deborah and Rabbi Robert Slosberg Collection, the space features a drop-down screen, a built-in projection and sound system and Wi-Fi. It also includes a glass wall, which includes display cases for UofL’s Jewish Studies Program, part of the Department of Comparative Humanities, to use to highlight its collections.

The Susan and William Yarmuth Jewish Studies Reading Room will be used for reflection, study space, public events and guest speakers. The newly designed room can seat up to 42.


In Memoriam: Photographer Ron Morris (1947-2021)

By Trish Blair, Art Library Collections Coordinator

In the fall of 2018, I met Ron Morris for the first time, and the very first thing he said to me and my co-worker Kathy Moore, is that he was dying. And that is how our partnership began – with that brutally honest and poignant statement.

Photo of woman with dark hair standing before a barn door. Part of Morris' portraits.
Woman standing in front of a barn. Part of Morris’ “Portraits” series.

He asked if the Art Library would be interested in a donation of maybe 200 of his books about photography.  Since we were between directors, we consulted with Libraries Dean Fox, Tyler Goldberg (Head of Technical Services), Matt Wyatt (Development Director), and James Procell (Interim head, Art Library), and decided to accept, as photography is one of our most popular collections.  After meeting with Mr. Morris, that quickly turned into a donation of over 1,100 titles.  We don’t have an official value, but a rough estimate is about $175,000. We think it was the largest single donation to the Bridwell Art Library.

Image of two birds in a cage on a table set for two in front of a Paris cafe.
Two birds on a table in front of a Paris cafe.

I began working with Mr. Morris, taking his hand-written lists of books and arranging for pick-ups. In the summer of 2019, I took our student intern at the time, Maree Grosser, with me for the heavy lifting.  Once a week we would drive to Mr. Morris’ house and fill either my car or the library van with the treasures he was gifting to us.  He would always have jazz or classical music playing and was happy to find out that Maree was an aspiring photographer. His keen intellect and interest in both our lives was comforting. He and I shared a love of taking pictures of things that were not “pretty” to museum standards. 

To say that he was eclectic is an understatement. He was unconventional, funny, and warm.  He collected antique typewriters, cameras, and books of all sorts. He had a very large collection of Chuck Taylor shoes that perfectly suited his style and being. His apartment was like a museum, mixed with a bookstore, mixed with a comfy home.

Woman with bare shoulders sitting on a couch.
From Morris’ “Portraits.”

Ron Morris was a Louisville native and alumni of UofL’s Hite Art Institute (1969). He was also the Arts editor at the Louisville Cardinal during his undergrad period. He went from UofL to the Massachusetts College of Art for his MFA (1982) and settled in Boston for 40 years teaching photography at Newtown High School and honing his craft.  He retired from teaching in 2014 and moved back to Louisville.  His photographs have been exhibited at the Addison Gallery of American Art, Hofstra University, MIT, the Portland Art Museum, Newton Art Center, Vision Gallery, Rhode Island School of Design, the New England School of Photography, the Memphis Academy of Art, the Hudson River Museum, Northeastern University and Texas A&M University, and the Caviar Forge & Gallery in Louisville.

We had great plans to celebrate his donation in 2020, but Covid cancelled them.  Unfortunately for us, Mr. Morris passed away in the spring of 2021. Through his death we have added more items to our collection from his estate: prints of his photography; self-made books; graphic design images of the objects he collected; re-imagined movie posters; and of course more books. We will celebrate his gift sometime in the near future, but until then we will keep adding the objects he gave to us and remembering the man who was so inspirational.


New Films – October 2021

SGA Collection

Freaky DVD Cover
  • Alias Grace
  • Barb & Star go to Vista Del Mar
  • Bill & Ted Face the Music
  • Birds of Prey
  • Call Me Crazy
  • The Croods a New Age
  • The Current War
  • Des
  • Emma
  • Frankie & Alice
  • Freaky
  • The Gentlemen
  • The Grudge
  • Half Brothers
  • Honest Thief
  • Hustlers
  • It Chapter Two
  • Just Mercy
  • The Last Shift
  • Like A Boss
  • Line of Duty
  • Miss Fisher and the Crypt of Tears
  • Onward
  • A Perfect Planet
  • Pinocchio
  • Playing with Fire
  • Polaroid
  • Scoob
  • The Secret Garden
  • The Secret She Keeps
  • Shadow in the Cloud
  • Soul
  • Spies in Disguise
  • The Turning
  • The Woman in White
  • Wonder woman 1984
  • Black Lighting Season One
  • Death in Paradise Season Nine
  • Doctor Who Season Twelve
  • Lovecraft Country Season One
  • Miss Scarlet and the Duke
  • Miss Bradley Mysteries Complete Series
  • NCIS Season 17
  • Riverdale Season Three
  • Scooby Doo The Sword and the Scoob
  • Shakespeare & Hathaway Private Investigators Season One

New Films – September 2021

The High Note DVD Cover

SGA Collection

  • 1917
  • Bad Boys for Life
  • Cats
  • Clemency
  • Dolittle
  • Friendsgiving
  • The High Note
  • Home
  • Inheritance
  • The Long Song
  • Love, Weddings & Other Disasters
  • Military Wives
  • Mulan
  • Richard Jewell
  • Sonic the Hedgehog
  • Spontaneous
  • Tremors: A Cold Day in Hell
  • Trolls: World Tour
  • Balthazar Series One
  • Coffee Prince: Complete Series
  • Father Brown Season Eight
  • Parks and Recreation Season Five
  • Scott and Bailey Series Two
  • She Ra and the Princesses of Power Seasons 1-3
  • Stranger Things Seasons 1-3
  • Titans Season Two
  • Yellowstone Season Two

New Films – August 2021

SGA Collection

Queen and Slim
  • 21 Bridges
  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
  • Black Christmas
  • Bombshell
  • Charlie’s Angels
  • Dark Waters
  • Frankie
  • Frozen 2
  • Judas and the Black Messiah
  • Knives Out
  • The Little Things
  • Maleficent: Mistress of Evil
  • The Marksman
  • Midway
  • Minari
  • The Nightingale
  • Queen and Slim
  • The Reckoning
  • Roma
  • Star Wars the Last Jedi
  • The Virtuoso
  • The Alienist: Angel of Darkness
  • Balthazar Series 2
  • The Best of the New Scooby Doo Movies
  • Death in Paradise Season 7
  • Dorm Life: Semester 1
  • Father Brown: Season 7
  • Fantasia 2000
  • Gamer
  • Hero Dog: The Journey Home
  • Jekyll and Hyde
  • Just Married
  • The Librarian movie trilogy
  • My Love from the Star: complete series
  • Queen and I: complete series
  • Short Circuit 2
  • Swamp Thing: the complete series

Ekstrom Library adds new resources on African Diaspora, Black Drama and Black Studies

The University Libraries have added new materials to Ekstrom Library’s digital collections, including links to primary source documents, recordings, video and other materials on Black studies, Black drama and the African diaspora. The additions support the University of Louisville’s drive to become an anti-racist campus.

Among the materials are the transcript of the trial of Clay v. United States (Muhammad Ali); 2,500 pages of exclusive Black Panther oral histories; and the full text of over 1,700 plays by African diaspora playwrights, including previously unpublished plays by Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka and Zora Neale Hurston among other authors.

Poster of Black Thought and Culture, highlighting a new database added to Ekstrom Library

The digital databases also offer UofL scholars and researchers access to the former Hatch-Billops Collection which includes 5,000 pages of rare interviews, oral histories, photos, original art, poetry, and other firsthand perspectives tracking African American cultural trends in the 20th century. Interview subjects include Dizzy Gillespie, Arnold Rampersand, Errol Hill, Anne Cooke Reid, Butterfly McQueen, and Charles Mingus; many recordings took place when these figures were nearing the ends of their lives, capturing a historical record that would otherwise be lost.

“It’s exciting to provide these new materials to our students and we do think they will appreciate the breadth of these digital databases,” said Libraries Dean Bob Fox. “This is part of our commitment to supporting UofL’s goal of creating an anti-racist campus.”

Recently, Dean Fox reallocated gift funding to purchase books, DVDs, digital collections and other materials on civil rights, equity, and Black history, among other subjects, in support of UofL’s anti-racism initiative.

Image of Black Studies in Video, a database added to Ekstrom Library

The purchases from Alexander Street Press include:

African Diaspora

Primary source documents exploring the migrations, communities and ideologies of the people of African descent who have dispersed around the world.  The focus is on communities in the Caribbean, Brazil, India, United Kingdom and France.  1860-present.

Black Drama: Third Edition

Approximately 1,700 plays by 250 North American playwrights, together with detailed information on productions, theaters, production companies, and more.  The database also includes selected playbills, production photographs and other ephemera related to the plays.  1850-present.

Black Studies in Video

Black Studies in Video is a collection documentaries, interviews, and archival footage exploring the black experience through history, politics, art and culture, family structure, gender relationships, and social and economic issues. 

Black Thought and Culture

Black Thought and Culture is a collection of nonfiction writings by major American black leaders—teachers, artists, politicians, religious leaders, athletes, war veterans, entertainers, and other figures—covering 250 years of history.  It includes letters, speeches, essays, political leaflets, interviews, and transcripts.