Telling the University Libraries’ Story

What are we, the University Libraries, all about? What do we do, and what is our story?

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Discover. Create. Succeed.

These three words describe our patrons’ process of interaction with the Libraries. They evoke the wonder and excitement of learning, the reciprocal interaction between finding material and turning it into scholarship, and the projected outcome of having interacted with our invaluable resources, whether printed, digital or human.

The University Libraries are vital to the academic success of the University of Louisville community. Both on campus and online, we are a key resource, teaching students best practices in scholarly research and collaborating with faculty to support their pedagogy. Our rich resources promote academic success. Above all, we help make UofL great.

With an important place in the UofL framework, the Libraries invite students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors to revisit our facilities and interact with our resources, and our people.

The University Libraries support over 170 fields of study within 12 schools and colleges. Over three million people visit our libraries annually, and millions more access our website at http://www.louisville.edu/library. As members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the University of Louisville Libraries rank among the top 100 academic research libraries in North America.

Visit your University Library to learn more!


Libraries bid Fond Farewell to OLT’s Sahab Bolhari

On Friday, the Libraries says goodbye to a familiar, friendly member of the technical crew. Sahab Bolhari, a student worker with the Libraries’ Office of Libraries Technology (OLT), has been hired as a Technical Specialist with the History, Anthropology and Geography/Geosciences departments, and begins work on January 11.

Highly proficient, congenial, and a member of the tech crew since July, 2012, Bolhari will be greatly missed by his co-workers. sahab_bolhari

“Sahab has that renaissance blend, a unique pairing of preeminence as a technician, but also someone who likes people and is nice to work with,” said Troy Plumer, OLT technology consultant. “He embodies that liberal arts adage, ‘The next best thing to knowing is knowing how to find out.’”

“IT is constantly changing . . . Sahab really understands this and is constantly evolving,” Plumer continued.

“We’ll miss him greatly.”

Bolhari is set to graduate in May with a major in political science, and a minor in Russian Studies. His first love is IT, though, and he has enjoyed working with OLT for the past three years.

“IT is my passion. I haven’t had a single day where I’ve dreaded going into work. I really enjoy what I do, so that makes things easy.”

So why the political science degree? “The degree is just to make me a more well-rounded person,” he said.

He had praise for his co-workers as well.

“I learned a lot from Sheila [Birkla],” he said. “She has been kind of my mentor here. I didn’t know as much as I thought I did when I first got here. She gave me lots of advice and that has been very important.”

Members of OLT will honor Sahab with cake and cookies on Friday, January 8th, celebrating his new position, and bidding a sad farewell.

Luckily he’ll just be a two-minute walk across the Belknap campus, in Lutz Hall.

Sahab is among some 90 students who work for the University Libraries with tasks such as research, customer service, administrative support, checking out books and equipment, and other duties. Students learn how to navigate a real job, and the Libraries truly benefit from their efforts.

“We are one of the largest employers of student workers on campus,” said Libraries Associate Dean Melissa Laning. “They are a hugely important part of the services we offer.”


UofL Libraries Dean Robert E. Fox, Jr. Wins 2015 Campus Development Award

Dean Bob Fox was awarded the William J. Rothwell Faculty Award for distinguished service in development for 2015. Eligible recipients must be a dean, associate dean, department chair, professor, or associate professor who has distinguished him/herself among their colleagues in service specific to development during that calendar year. Dean Fox was the only person outside University Development to be awarded.

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Libraries Dean Bob Fox and Director of Major Gifts Denise Nuehring.

Nominated by Libraries’ Director of Major Gifts Denise Nuehring, Dean Fox received the award from Keith Inman, Vice President for Institutional Advancement, on December 16th. Nuehring’s nomination praised Fox’s “leadership and unwavering support” in building a development program within a difficult fundraising atmosphere over the past four years.

The letter continues:

The library is a challenging fundraising environment due to the alumni being the priority of the academic units for fundraising purposes.  Working within this constraint takes creativity to identify methods to expand the prospect pool.    Dean Fox has shown a willingness to try different avenues and has been supportive of the many ideas presented to him.  He participates in the development process continually and often contributes financially as well to cover program expenses.

Dean Fox is an excellent leader with an exceptional ability to motivate and inspire his direct reports.   He creates an environment which allows one to not feel daunted by challenges but instead to see them as opportunities for exploration, growth and success personally and professionally.


Local and National Media Coverage for Happy Birthday Manuscript

The “Happy Birthday” song, originally titled, “Good Morning to You,” written by Louisville sisters Mildred and Patty Hill, has been much in the news lately as the focus of a lawsuit to determine its public domain status.

But there’s a fascinating local twist, as in UofL Music Library local.  While archiving a collection donated in the 1950s, Music Library Director James Procell discovered what appears to be the earliest known manuscript of the “Happy Birthday” song.

And the local and national press is quite interested.

Please tune in to the following:

  • Procell interview with Joe Arnold from WHAS11, September 1st at 6 p.m.
  • WFPL radio interview with Procell on September 1st in the afternoon.
  • Procell appearance on “Great Day Live” with Terry Meiners and Rachel Platt on WHAS11 on Thursday morning, September 3rd.

Also, please see the links below for further coverage. When more comes, we’ll let you know.

Kudos to James and the Music Library! Featured image

Billboard Magazine:

http://www.billboard.com/articles/business/6685030/happy-birthday-manuscript-found-louisville-library-copyright

Reuters:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/08/31/us-music-life-happybirthday-idUKKCN0R021O20150831

NY Daily News:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/happy-birthday-original-sheet-music-found-louisville-article-1.2344314

Insider Louisville:

http://insiderlouisville.com/metro/education-community/forgotten-manuscript-pre-happy-birthday-song-found-uofl-archives/

Tech Times:

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/80890/20150901/librarian-discovers-19th-century-manuscript-for-song-that-inspired-happy-birthday.htm

Philly Voice:

http://www.phillyvoice.com/college-manuscript-song-inspired-happy-birthday/

WAVE3:

http://www.wave3.com/story/29923430/early-version-of-happy-birthday-song-discovered-at-uofl

WHAS:

http://www.whas11.com/story/news/local/2015/08/31/happy-birthday-sheet-music-found-uofl-file-cabinet/71471278/

Youtube Video:


Libraries Upgrade Cloud-Based Catalog and Management System

As many of you are aware, the University of Louisville Libraries system is upgrading its catalog to the latest version, OCLC’s WorldCat Discovery, a cloud-based system. The upgrade, scheduled for early June, will enhance search capacity, expand user services, and continue to meet the evolving requirements of library faculty and staff.
Most of the changes will be minor shifts in the interface or functionality, but you may also notice changes in:
• The login screen for off-campus access.
• The process for renewing books online.
• The process for requesting items from the Robotic Retrieval System.
• The Journal Finder.
All changes will be described in this WorldCat Discovery Guide. (Please check back as the guide will be regularly updated).
Simultaneous to the switch of the catalog, a much larger transition will be happening behind the scenes, on the library staff side of the system. The UofL Libraries will move from the Ex Libris Voyager system, in use since 1998, to OCLC’s WorldShare Management System (WMS). The change in workflow is significant, as WMS’s technology represents an evolution to a cloud-based system of library operations. While some issues are inevitable in a transition of this scale, the Libraries will strive to minimize the impact on patron services.
Three other Kentucky universities, Eastern Kentucky University, Kentucky State University, Northern Kentucky University, have either gone live, or plan to soon, with WorldCat Discovery. Over 325 libraries in three countries are currently using WMS to share bibliographic records, publisher and knowledge base data, vendor records, serials patterns and more. UofL Libraries will be the third Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member to use the system.
The UofL Libraries apologizes in advance for any inconvenience caused by this upgrade, and welcomes your feedback on the new system. For any additional questions, please contact the Libraries’ WMS team: Tyler Goldberg (stgold01@exchange.louisville.edu), Randy Kuehn (rtkueh01@exchange.louisville.edu) or Weiling Liu (w0liu001@exchange.louisville.edu).


The Beginnings of the UofL Band

by James Procell

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UofL Band displaying their first uniform, on the front steps of Grawemeyer Hall, E.J. Wotawa, conductor, 1928

The University of Louisville Band began in 1928 when E.J. Wotowa came to the University of Louisville from Male High School to teach music. He recruited musicians for his all-male band by offering college credit for participation in the ensemble. Robert Worth Bingham, a local newspaper owner, also provided funding for the band. In the Fall of 1933, the UofL band began performing at football games. Shortly after, Wotowa stepped down as director, and was followed by a string of other successful directors. In 1937, the band received a standing invitation to play My Old Kentucky Home at the Kentucky Derby. To this day, the band continues to attend the Derby and perform the song to an audience of millions.

In 1938, Ernest Lyon was hired as director of the band. Though World War II caused a decline in the band’s activity, he worked very hard to resurrect the program in the early and mid-1940s. In 1947, UofL president John Taylor gave the rebuilding effort a boost. He set up an independent Division of Bands, and Lyon was allotted a large number of $50 per semester scholarships to encourage musicians to join the band. Under Lyon’s direction, the band quickly grew to over 100 members, and included female members for the first time. In 1947, the band travelled to Hattiesburg, Mississippi to attend the UofL vs. Southern Miss. football game. The band, previously known as the “Best Dressed Band in Dixie,” had to abandon that title after it was discovered that another university band held claim to the title. The band then became known as the “Marching Cardinals,” a title that it still holds today.

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UofL Band in formation in front of Grawemeyer Hall with Hilda Gay Mayberry, majorette, holding her Miss Majorette of America 1952 certificate

The late 1940s through the early 1950s were a particularly active time for the band. Fans at Manual and Parkway Stadiums were treated to spectacular halftime shows, including amazing twirling performances by Hilda Gay Mayberry, who was named the nation’s best majorette in 1952. Outside of the marching field, the concert band commissioned many new works via the work of Ernest Lyon and the newly-formed music fraternity Pi Kappa Omicron, which was founded at the University of Louisville. Works commissioned by the fraternity include Vincent Persichetti’s Psalm for Band and William Schuman’s Chester, amongst many other works which are now considered standard repertoire for concert bands.

The photos are from the music library’s UofL Historic Band Collection, which includes hundreds of photographs, clippings, recordings, and other early band memorabilia. If you are interested in learning more about the history of the band or this wonderful collection, please contact music librarian James Procell.

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UofL trumpet players in uniform pose for photo with Thinker statue in front of Grawemeyer Hall, early 1950s


Find Resources Faster with New Research Guides

by Terri Holtze, Head of Library Web Services

When you need articles or primary sources for your research our Research Guides site is a great place to start. On December 16th the site will have some new features to make this process even easier for you.

What’s new?

  1. Find all guides in your area of interest from the homepage. The list of topics on the homepage will automatically give you a list of all our research guides on that topic – rather than just listing the general topic guide for that area. For example, rather than just going directly to the Business Research Guide, when you click on Business it will show you all the business-related guides like the one for Business Plan Research or the guide for the MKT 350 class.
  2. New subject areas. In the past we’ve tied our subject areas closely to areas of teaching and research at the University of Louisville. We continue to do that in the newest version, but we’ve added a couple of new subject areas that people frequently need help researching, including guides on Library Science and Louisville, Ky.
  3. Chat with a librarian. The homepage will now include a chat box that you can use to talk to a librarian about your research questions. They can help you choose a database, formulate a search strategy, or set up an appointment for more in-depth guidance.

new Research Guides homepage

  1. Find databases by subject. The new A-Z Databases list has some great new features. You can limit the list to just databases in a particular subject. Doing a subject limit will show you the most recommended databases in that subject first, followed by a list of all the databases that cover it. The results page will also show you who the subject librarian is and what research guides are available for the topic.
  1. Find databases by type. You can also limit the databases list to show only certain types of databases. This is a great way to find music (audio/video), images, primary sources, and more.
  2. Databases search. The databases list will also include a search box that will search through the database titles and descriptions.

databases limited to a subject

Want to get a sneak peak before it goes live? You can see it at http://louisville.beta.libguides.com/. When it goes live it will have the same address as the current version which is http://louisville.libguides.com/.