New Peer-Reviewed Journal in ThinkIR

By Rachel Howard

Most peer-reviewed academic journals are subscription-based: some require high fees from academic libraries and their institutions, while others charge authors directly if they want to make their content freely available to other scholars and researchers through open access. The University of Louisville recently launched its own open access, peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Respiratory Infections, using ThinkIR, the University of Louisville’s institutional repository in University Libraries.

Released on January 30, the new journal is one of several open access journals planned for hosting in ThinkIR that will serve the needs of scholars and researchers worldwide regardless of their means and without toll barriers.

img_7675bestLeft to right: Rachel Howard, Sarah Frankel, and Jessica Petrey of University Libraries; Dr. Julio Ramirez, Dr. Bill Mattingly, Kimberley Buckner, and Matt Grassman of Division of Infectious Diseases.

Doctors in UofL’s Division of Infectious Diseases approached their Clinical Librarian, Kornhauser Library’s Jessica Petrey, last year about their idea to publish two open access journals: one focused on respiratory infections and the other on refugee and global health. They had thought through the aims and scope of these journals, and identified who within the division and the field they wanted to be involved, but they needed the Libraries’ help with hosting it and providing digital preservation of journal content – a prerequisite to getting it listed in PubMed.

Jessica put them in touch with Rachel Howard, Digital Initiatives Librarian, whose work involves digital preservation as well as open access. As a result of the work of Rachel, Sarah Frankel, the Libraries’ Open Access and Repository Coordinator, Dwayne K. Buttler, the Evelyn G. Schneider Endowed Chair for Scholarly Communication at UofL, and the Scholarly Communication and Data Management Work Group, the Libraries developed policies, procedures, and agreements to support the Division of Infectious Diseases as a pilot project for a new phase of repository development. Jessica expanded her support of the Division by serving as copy editor of the journal.

On January 30, 2017, the Division of Infectious Diseases celebrated the launch of Journal of Respiratory Infections Volume 1, Issue 1, with a party at MedCenterOne. Petrey, Howard, and Frankel were in attendance, where they were warmly thanked by Division of Infectious Diseases Chief Dr. Julio Ramirez.


Telling the University Libraries’ Story

What are we, the University Libraries, all about? What do we do, and what is our story?

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Discover. Create. Succeed.

These three words describe our patrons’ process of interaction with the Libraries. They evoke the wonder and excitement of learning, the reciprocal interaction between finding material and turning it into scholarship, and the projected outcome of having interacted with our invaluable resources, whether printed, digital or human.

The University Libraries are vital to the academic success of the University of Louisville community. Both on campus and online, we are a key resource, teaching students best practices in scholarly research and collaborating with faculty to support their pedagogy. Our rich resources promote academic success. Above all, we help make UofL great.

With an important place in the UofL framework, the Libraries invite students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors to revisit our facilities and interact with our resources, and our people.

The University Libraries support over 170 fields of study within 12 schools and colleges. Over three million people visit our libraries annually, and millions more access our website at http://www.louisville.edu/library. As members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the University of Louisville Libraries rank among the top 100 academic research libraries in North America.

Visit your University Library to learn more!


Applying Medical Theory to Daily Clinical Librarianship: Insights from Prestigious EBCP Workshop

To benefit their patrons – physicians, clinicians, medical and dental students – clinical librarians at the University of Louisville’s Kornhauser Library are actively seeking to deepen their understanding of contemporary medical theories and practice.

This summer, Assistant Director and Clinical Librarian Vida Vaughn attended the prestigious Evidence-Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) workshop at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.  Her main goals were to learn how to assess biostatistics in medical literature, expand her awareness of evidence-based practice, and become a better clinical librarian and teacher.

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Vida Vaughn, Kornhauser clinical librarian, interacts with dental students during a seminar break.

She soon realized that biostatistics analysis “is a graduate program in itself. But I came away knowing I can look at the literature more competently now.”

Vaughn’s work involves teaching students and clinicians on the Health Sciences Campus in the classroom setting, small groups or one-on-one, and also partnering with other medical educators. She said the workshop has helped her work more effectively, particularly with medical faculty at UofL.  Gaining their buy-in and confidence is a constant mission and based on hard work, she said.

“I learned how much physicians crave the assistance of a librarian. When they heard what I do for UofL Physicians, they were just amazed and wanted to know how to get something similar started in their organizations.”

“They have so much advanced medical knowledge and training that it can be challenging,” said Vaughn. “You have to work very hard to prove yourself, to begin to gain a level of trust. But when you help solve someone’s problem for them, they become your best advocate.”

The immersive, week-long workshop is designed to benefit physicians, nurses, dentists, clinical librarians and other health-care professionals, who learn more about EBCP – and how to teach it – in a small-group setting. EBCP is a contemporary approach to healthcare practice that “explicitly acknowledges the evidence that bears on each patient management decision, the strength of that evidence, the benefits and risk of alternative management strategies, and the role of patients’ values and preferences in trading off those benefits and risks.”

All attendees work for 10-hour days throughout the week to explore a broad curricula. Vaughn worked alongside three family practice physicians, two naturopath physicians, an optician, a research professor, a mentor in training, and another clinical librarian. “It was extremely extensive, very intense. Everyone leaves completely exhausted.”

What surprised her most was how clinicians truly view her work as a librarian.

“I learned how much physicians crave the assistance of a librarian. When they heard what I do for UofL Physicians, they were just amazed and wanted to know how to get something similar started in their organizations. The type of embeddedness and buy-in that exists at our institution is not readily available to many clinicians around the country.  At UofL, our clinical librarian team has made a concerted effort to be accepted as part of the medical teams. With some departments, I’m embedded to the point of being considered part of the furniture.”

Despite the asymmetry in medical training between the participants, there was no haughtiness or “lording it over anyone. Their attitude was, ‘We’re just here to help each other get through the workshop.’ It was an intense learning experience for everyone.

“I was pleasantly surprised by how supportive the physicians were on my process and learning. They were very engaged and mentored me through the workshops. In the critique of her presentation, her fellow group mates counseled, ‘You shouldn’t apologize so much for what you feel you don’t know because you know much more than you think.’

“I felt extremely sustained by that because I had felt quite out of my league at times.”

Vaughn, who is president of the Kentucky Medical Library Association, spoke about the workshop at a recent KMLA meeting and found a highly receptive audience.

“Now that we have made this investment in my learning, it’s my turn to come back and teach my staff and colleagues and impart the things I’ve learned.”


Kornhauser Library to Host MLA Webcast “The Consumer Health Library: A Site for Service, Education, and Hope”

Kornhauser Health Sciences Library is pleased to host another MLA (Medical Library Association) Webcast:

The Consumer Health Library: A Site for Service, Education, and Hope

Tuesday, April 26, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) in the History Room (3rd floor of Kornhauser Library)

Our address is 500 S Preston St. Louisville, KY 40292. Parking passes will be provided for those who plan to attend who are not affiliated with the University of Louisville.

Program Overview:

Consumer health libraries are a critical bridge for contemporary medicine models that require patients to both advocate for themselves, as well as partner with, their health care providers. With the continuously changing technology, the ever-increasing amount of information available, and patients’ real need to navigate successfully through the system, librarians’ services can provide the welcoming space and outreach to educate and inform our customers.

Learning Objectives:

By the completion of the webinar, participants will understand:

  1. the role of the consumer health librarian
  2. outreach into the local community
  3. the community or target audience
  4. issues regarding health literacy and how it impacts their library services
  5. specific programs that can be adapted to their institutional sites

Jacqueline Davis has worked for eight years as the consumer health librarian for Sharp HealthCare in San Diego, CA. She has had the opportunity to work in many different library settings and has enjoyed the work in each of them. She has a particular interest in health literacy as well as social justice. Combining both of these passions has informed and guided her work in the library and the community. In 2013, Davis received the Consumer Health Librarian of the Year award from the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section of the Medical Library Association. She has published in the Journal of Hospital Librarianship and Journal of Consumer Health On the Internet; contributed a chapter on marketing the consumer health library in the MLA book, The Medical Library Association Guide to Providing Consumer and Patient Health Information; and contributed a chapter in the soon-to-be published MLA book, Consumer Health Information Programs and Services: Best Practices. Additionally, she is also a passionate fan of cat videos.

There is no cost to attend this webinar. The sponsorship of this webcast site has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, under Contract No. HHSN-276-2011-00005C with the University of Illinois at Chicago.

A link to the participant’s manual will be distributed, and MLA (Medical Library Association) members can earn 1.5 MLA CE points for attending and completing the MLA evaluation form online. If you plan to attend, please respond to Tiffney Gipson at tagips01@louisville.edu by April 22nd.


Libraries’ Expanded Electronic Collections Allow for Easier Research

Beneath the flurry of renovation on the third floor in Ekstrom Library, the Libraries have made some strategic moves to allow for expanded digital access to some bound journals that have been removed prior to construction.

Older, hardbound journals have been removed to clear space for the Delphi Center’s new Teaching Innovation Learning Laboratory (TILL), slated for construction this summer in Ekstrom. However, these collections haven’t gone away; most have either been replaced by digital versions, or moved to the Robotic Retrieval System (RRS). In most cases, the Libraries are expanding access to journals and other collections.

“We’ve increased the number of journal titles available digitally,” said University Libraries Dean Bob Fox. “This will greatly benefit all the Libraries and their patrons.”

“In some cases, we’ve been able to provide access to all editions of journals that were previously only available in part.”

The Libraries’ administration has forged agreements with publishers, including Mergent, for business collections; JSTOR, for humanities and social science materials; Wiley, for science, public health, medicine, and social sciences titles; and the NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine).

“The TILL, the expanded collections, and, in future, the renovated learning spaces, are all ways the Libraries are working to advance the University’s research and teaching mission,” Fox said.

Fundraising efforts are in place to renovate the entire third floor, to upgrade student seating and study spaces. Over the summer, an additional arm of the RRS will be built to house lesser-used journals and other materials removed from the third floor.


Civil Rights Exhibit on Display at Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, Opening February 2, 2016

University of Louisville Kornhauser Health Sciences Library will host a three-part exhibit on Civil Rights.  The exhibit will run from February 2, 2016 – April 29, 2016 and will feature information on the bus boycott, the March on Washington, the Selma march, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and many other prominent events from the Civil Rights movement.  The three-part exhibit will be shown as follows:

February 2, 2016 – February 29. 2016 “The Road to the Promised Land”

March 1, 2016 – March 31, 2016 “The Selma March”

April 1, 2016 – April 29, 2016 “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”

The exhibits will be on display 24/7 on the main floor of the Kornhauser Library.

Questions or comments?  Contact Tiffney Gipson, 852-8530, tagips01@louisville.edu


Libraries bid Fond Farewell to OLT’s Sahab Bolhari

On Friday, the Libraries says goodbye to a familiar, friendly member of the technical crew. Sahab Bolhari, a student worker with the Libraries’ Office of Libraries Technology (OLT), has been hired as a Technical Specialist with the History, Anthropology and Geography/Geosciences departments, and begins work on January 11.

Highly proficient, congenial, and a member of the tech crew since July, 2012, Bolhari will be greatly missed by his co-workers. sahab_bolhari

“Sahab has that renaissance blend, a unique pairing of preeminence as a technician, but also someone who likes people and is nice to work with,” said Troy Plumer, OLT technology consultant. “He embodies that liberal arts adage, ‘The next best thing to knowing is knowing how to find out.’”

“IT is constantly changing . . . Sahab really understands this and is constantly evolving,” Plumer continued.

“We’ll miss him greatly.”

Bolhari is set to graduate in May with a major in political science, and a minor in Russian Studies. His first love is IT, though, and he has enjoyed working with OLT for the past three years.

“IT is my passion. I haven’t had a single day where I’ve dreaded going into work. I really enjoy what I do, so that makes things easy.”

So why the political science degree? “The degree is just to make me a more well-rounded person,” he said.

He had praise for his co-workers as well.

“I learned a lot from Sheila [Birkla],” he said. “She has been kind of my mentor here. I didn’t know as much as I thought I did when I first got here. She gave me lots of advice and that has been very important.”

Members of OLT will honor Sahab with cake and cookies on Friday, January 8th, celebrating his new position, and bidding a sad farewell.

Luckily he’ll just be a two-minute walk across the Belknap campus, in Lutz Hall.

Sahab is among some 90 students who work for the University Libraries with tasks such as research, customer service, administrative support, checking out books and equipment, and other duties. Students learn how to navigate a real job, and the Libraries truly benefit from their efforts.

“We are one of the largest employers of student workers on campus,” said Libraries Associate Dean Melissa Laning. “They are a hugely important part of the services we offer.”