“Which bridge did Muhammed Ali throw his medal off of?” and other interesting questions answered by the Research Assistance & Instruction Department

By Anna Marie Johnson

Imagine a job where you were able to learn about all kinds of different and fascinating topics in the process of helping someone answer a burning question that they have. That is part of the work of the Research Assistance and Instruction (RAI) office. Librarians, professional staff, and peer research assistants answer questions like these (and much more prosaic ones such as “Why can’t I access this journal article I need?”)  via e-mail, chat, phone, or face-to-face:

  • How many buildings are there on Belknap Campus?
  • How did St. Paul come to be a Roman citizen?
  • What is the childhood address of Hunter S. Thompson?
  • What was the roll call vote for the Kentucky senators and House members for the Civil Rights Act of 1964?
  • Can you help me research design for justifying the excavation of a privy?
  • What are the cultural reactions regarding American Indians during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (1870-1929)—particularly in how American Indians and the related federal policies were represented in the media?
  • Where can I find industry and consumer data for Gillette Fusion?
  • What are the general prosodic characteristics of English and Spanish?

Over the years, we have helped with questions that ranged from the esoteric (journal articles on the dead Sabaean language, from someone wanting to piece together the language and write a book about it) to the downright impossible, such as the patron who wanted a copy of the WHAS Radio broadcast license from 1927, or the patron researching obscure magicians and street performers from Europe.

“What’s the best book you’ve ever read?”

While we go to great lengths to track down an answer, sometimes there’s a little luck involved. One day, a call came in to Rob Detmering, the librarian responsible for Film Studies. The caller was looking for one of the original copies of a 1972 film called Asylum of Satan. The film had reportedly been shot here in Louisville and the out-of-state caller thought that the university might have a copy. Rob asked around to the Archives, the Art Department, and a few other campus contacts that he thought might know something,

“How many theaters exist in the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel?”

but to no avail. Rob did some digging in the online database for the Courier-Journal that the library subscribes to and discovered the film had been shown at a film festival in 2008 at Baxter Avenue Theatre. Rob called the theater and spoke with someone who not only knew the film but knew the location of the copy that they had used in the showing.

We often learn a lot as we’re helping.  Our former Libraries Diversity Resident George Martinez received a question from a faculty member asking about the history of the African American Theater program at UofL. He looked through some microfilm and consulted with our colleagues in the Archives & Special Collections to find articles that traced the history of a controversy over how money generated by the Fiesta Bowl was being used for scholarships. The results of that controversy was the increase in hiring and scholarship distribution to increase the diversity at UofL.

Got Questions? Ekstrom’s RAI Department can help you track down your answer! Oh, and there is some doubt as to whether Ali ever threw his medal off any bridge, but the closest answer is the Clark Memorial.

 


Presentations at the Kentucky Library Association Annual Conference

Several faculty and staff will represent the University of Louisville Libraries at the upcoming Kentucky Library Association Conference this weekend at the Galt House in downtown Louisville. Following are some of the presentations and presenters at this year’s event, which runs from September 21-23.

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ETDplus:​ ​Guidance​ ​for​ ​Graduate​ ​Students’ Research​ ​Output

Rachel​ ​Howard,​ ​Digital​ ​Initiatives​ ​Librarian, and Dwayne​ ​Buttler,​ ​JD, Endowed Chair for Scholarly Communication

The​ ​IMLS-funded​ ​ETDplus​ ​project​ ​has​ ​produced guidance​ ​documentation,​ ​workshop​ ​materials, and​ ​software​ ​tools​ ​for​ ​students​ ​and​ ​staff​ ​to​ ​use in​ ​managing​ ​complex​ ​digital​ ​objects​ ​such​ ​as research​ ​data​ ​sets,​ ​video​ ​installations,​ ​websites and​ ​music​ ​recitals.​ ​These​ ​intellectual​ ​works cannot​ ​be​ ​captured​ ​in​ ​words​ ​alone​ ​and​ ​implicate copyright,​ ​metadata,​ ​file​ ​formats,​ ​versioning, and​ ​other​ ​research​ ​and​ ​practical​ ​challenges.​ ​We will​ ​demonstrate​ ​these​ ​freely​ ​available​ ​resources and​ ​their​ ​potential​ ​uses.

Renovations​ ​and​ ​Innovations:​ ​Merging Departments​ ​and​ ​Unit​ ​Cultures

Matthew​ ​Goldberg,​ ​Head, Access & User Services,​ ​Ekstrom​ ​Library; Ashley​ ​Triplett, Student Supervisor and Social Media Library Specialist, ​Ekstrom​ ​Library

This​ ​is​ ​the​ ​story​ ​of​ ​Ekstrom​ ​Library​ ​at​ ​the University​ ​of​ ​Louisville​ ​and​ ​its​ ​renovations​ ​during 2015​ ​and​ ​the​ ​experiences​ ​we​ ​had​ ​merging​ ​nine separate​ ​sub-departments​ ​into​ ​a​ ​single​ ​unit called​ ​Access​ ​and​ ​User​ ​Services.​ ​What​ ​may​ ​seem like​ ​a​ ​challenging​ ​process​ ​turned​ ​into​ ​an opportunity​ ​for​ ​growth​ ​and​ ​development.​ ​We will​ ​explore​ ​how​ ​we​ ​reexamined​ ​how​ ​the​ ​public desks​ ​prioritized​ ​our​ ​patrons​ ​and​ ​how​ ​we​ ​grew from​ ​several​ ​disjointed​ ​departments​ ​into​ ​a​ ​single unit​ ​with​ ​a​ ​unified​ ​department​ ​culture.

Kentucky​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​War:​ ​Filling​ ​and Operating​ ​Military​ ​Camp​ ​Libraries

Jonathan​ ​Jeffrey,​ ​Department​ ​Head,​ ​Manuscripts Coordinator,​ ​Western​ ​Kentucky​ ​University; and Delinda​ ​Stephens​ ​Buie,​ ​Curator​ ​of​ ​Rare​ ​Books, Archives​ ​&​ ​Special​ ​Collections

The​ ​American​ ​Library​ ​Association​ ​provided library​ ​services​ ​in​ ​U.S.​ ​military​ ​camps​ ​during WWI.​ ​To​ ​fill​ ​those​ ​libraries,​ ​Americans​ ​donated​ ​3 million​ ​books​ ​in​ ​1918​ ​with​ ​Kentuckians contributing​ ​generously.​ ​Louisville’s​ ​Camp Zachary​ ​Taylor​ ​was​ ​part​ ​of​ ​the​ ​ALA’s​ ​work​ ​to provide​ ​wholesome​ ​activities​ ​in​ ​the​ ​training camps.​ ​They​ ​also​ ​sought​ ​to​ ​show​ ​the​ ​value​ ​and even​ ​“manliness”​ ​of​ ​libraries.​ ​Perhaps​ ​ironically, much​ ​of​ ​the​ ​work​ ​at​ ​Taylor​ ​was​ ​done​ ​by​ ​women from​ ​the​ ​Louisville​ ​Free​ ​Public​ ​Library.

Research​ ​DIY:​ ​Enhancing​ ​Online​ ​Learning Through​ ​Strategic​ ​Planning​ ​and​ ​Collaborative Professional​ ​Development

Robert​ ​Detmering,​ ​Information​ ​Literacy Coordinator,​ ​Information​ ​Literacy​ ​Coordinator; Amber​ ​Willenborg,​ ​Online​ ​Learning​ ​and​ ​Digital Media​ ​Librarian

We​ ​enhanced​ ​and​ ​expanded​ ​our​ ​online instruction​ ​program,​ ​while​ ​building​ ​buy-in​ ​within a​ ​departmental​ ​culture​ ​that​ ​was​ ​not​ ​enthusiastic about​ ​this​ ​work.​ ​Through​ ​strategic​ ​hiring, staffing​ ​reallocation,​ ​and​ ​collaborative professional​ ​development,​ ​we​ ​created​ ​general and​ ​customized​ ​online​ ​tools​ ​and​ ​services, including​ ​course-embedded​ ​content.​ ​We​ ​will share​ ​our​ ​team-based​ ​creative​ ​process, promotional​ ​activities,​ ​and​ ​initial​ ​assessment data​ ​for​ ​our​ ​homegrown​ ​research​ ​DIY​ ​site, Discover​ ​It​ ​Yourself.

 


Voices from Underground Music Scene Added to Archives

Across the country, a substantial number of academic musical archives are dedicated to folk, world, country, bluegrass, classical and other musical genres, while other popular forms – namely punk, hardcore, indie and rock – are left out of the mix.

Aiming to correct this imbalance, UofL’s Louisville Underground Music Archive (LUMA) was established in 2013 to preserve recordings, photographs, videos, ‘zines, set lists, fan mail, and other artifacts of the Louisville underground music scene from the late 1970s until the present.

Not only does LUMA not consider these musical genres to be chopped liver, it recently pursued and was given a grant of $1,800 by the Kentucky Oral History Commission (KOHC), allowing LUMA to add oral histories – interviews with individuals from the era – to its collection.

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Hard Times covered the hardcore/punk scene in Louisville.

“These oral histories will be an excellent way to round out our collection” said Heather Fox, co-director of the Oral History Center and archivist for manuscript collections with Archives and Special Collections. Eighteen-hundred dollars doesn’t sound like a lot of money, but it makes it possible for us to do this work,” said Fox, who will oversee the project.

Matched by funds from the ASC’s oral history budget, the project will be built with $3,600, most of which will go toward paying local journalist and former punk rocker Chip Nold to conduct interviews with musicians from the era.

Nold is not only an experienced journalist and interviewer, with a degree in history from Princeton, but was also the lead singer for Babylon Dance Band (aka “the Babs”), one of the first punk groups in Louisville, thus “the perfect candidate for the project,” Fox said.

“Chip had experience interviewing people for feature stories, but we made sure to train him on oral history methodology, and then sent him out with a trusty Marantz PMD 660 [a portable compact flash recorder] to get started.”

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Skull of Glee

“The oral history project fills in the gaps of our collection,” she continued. “It lets us discover what it was like to be playing music during that era, and what it felt like to be there then. This is something oral history is great at fleshing out.”

Among the first interview subjects  was a local music critic, with other musicians from the scene also on tap.

“LUMA is an effort to document part of Louisville’s culture that might not be documented otherwise. Music has played an important role in cultural life of Louisville and still does, and LUMA is filling in that gap.”

“When we’re collecting artifacts around a music scene, we’re less interested in the published material, because there are multiple copies of that. We’re more interested in finding unique items, like fan mail.”

As an example, LUMA has a collection of fan mail sent to Louisville hardcore band Endpoint. Mail addressed to the band came from fans in Louisville, around the U.S., and even Germany.

“Fan mail demonstrates the impact this music had on this community and in other parts of the country and world. . . .It documents the ways in which people communicated before the internet, which is really neat,” Fox said.

“There is fan mail from Louisville fans just across town to the guys in the band. I doubt that ever happens now. People are on Facebook or other social media and have immediate contact.”

Once completed, Fox will upload them to the digital collections where visitors will be able to search for specific passages within the recordings. Archives and Special Collections will be “integrating a new software that will allow us to index digital oral histories and then provide online access that will include a search box, to make the recording key-word searchable. It’s also time-coded, so you can go to the exact place in the audio to find that passage.”

“Ideally what we want is a full transcription of an interview; that’s the most time consuming thing of the process,” she continued.

Fox has eight years of experience with all aspects of oral history, including recording, transcribing and conducting such interviews. She also provided access to oral histories through her work at the Kentucky Historical Society on the Pass the Word website and at the University of Louisville’s CONTENTdm instance which provides online transcripts and streaming audio.

The LUMA advisory board is comprised of local musicians like Nathan Salsburg, musician and curator of the Alan Lomax Archive; musician and actor Will Oldham; Diane Pecknold, professor of popular culture who has written and edited books about country music (who is married to a member of the Louisville band Squirrel Bait); and other members of the community like John Timmons, owner of celebrated ear X-tacy, an erstwhile record store that employed many active participants in the scene, developed a list of active and well-known musicians in the scene during the early to mid-1980s.

Please browse the LUMA collection and find out more about Archives and Special Collections.


Website Redesign Brings Better Mobile Experience

You may have noticed some changes happening on the University of Louisville Libraries website. Last summer we introduced new sites for the Bridwell Art Library and the Dwight Anderson Memorial Music Library along with improved scheduling apps for room reservations and research appointments.

In March we released the new site for Archives & Special Collections.

In the upcoming months we’ll be bringing you new sites for the Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, Ekstrom Library, and the University of Louisville Libraries. Tentative dates for these releases are July 1 for the Kornhauser site and August 1 for the Ekstrom and UofL Libraries sites.

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Desktop view

Better Mobile Experience

Mobile view for new UofL Libraries homepage

Mobile view

A driving reason for these changes is the increasing use of mobile  devices for accessing all parts of the site. In the previous version of our site the homepages for each library provided limited options in the mobile view. The new version will have the complete content of the site in the mobile version as well as in desktop views.

URL Changes

Currently, our website is split between two systems; when the project is complete the entire site will be located on one system. URLs for the pages on the old system will change. For example, when the Music Library site moved its URL changed from louisville.edu/library/music to library.louisville.edu/music/home.

The content management system (CMS) we are moving to is designed specifically for libraries and provides tools to help us keep links and other content fresh.


New Peer-Reviewed Journal in ThinkIR

By Rachel Howard

Most peer-reviewed academic journals are subscription-based: some require high fees from academic libraries and their institutions, while others charge authors directly if they want to make their content freely available to other scholars and researchers through open access. The University of Louisville recently launched its own open access, peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Respiratory Infections, using ThinkIR, the University of Louisville’s institutional repository in University Libraries.

Released on January 30, the new journal is one of several open access journals planned for hosting in ThinkIR that will serve the needs of scholars and researchers worldwide regardless of their means and without toll barriers.

img_7675bestLeft to right: Rachel Howard, Sarah Frankel, and Jessica Petrey of University Libraries; Dr. Julio Ramirez, Dr. Bill Mattingly, Kimberley Buckner, and Matt Grassman of Division of Infectious Diseases.

Doctors in UofL’s Division of Infectious Diseases approached their Clinical Librarian, Kornhauser Library’s Jessica Petrey, last year about their idea to publish two open access journals: one focused on respiratory infections and the other on refugee and global health. They had thought through the aims and scope of these journals, and identified who within the division and the field they wanted to be involved, but they needed the Libraries’ help with hosting it and providing digital preservation of journal content – a prerequisite to getting it listed in PubMed.

Jessica put them in touch with Rachel Howard, Digital Initiatives Librarian, whose work involves digital preservation as well as open access. As a result of the work of Rachel, Sarah Frankel, the Libraries’ Open Access and Repository Coordinator, Dwayne K. Buttler, the Evelyn G. Schneider Endowed Chair for Scholarly Communication at UofL, and the Scholarly Communication and Data Management Work Group, the Libraries developed policies, procedures, and agreements to support the Division of Infectious Diseases as a pilot project for a new phase of repository development. Jessica expanded her support of the Division by serving as copy editor of the journal.

On January 30, 2017, the Division of Infectious Diseases celebrated the launch of Journal of Respiratory Infections Volume 1, Issue 1, with a party at MedCenterOne. Petrey, Howard, and Frankel were in attendance, where they were warmly thanked by Division of Infectious Diseases Chief Dr. Julio Ramirez.


Telling the University Libraries’ Story

What are we, the University Libraries, all about? What do we do, and what is our story?

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Discover. Create. Succeed.

These three words describe our patrons’ process of interaction with the Libraries. They evoke the wonder and excitement of learning, the reciprocal interaction between finding material and turning it into scholarship, and the projected outcome of having interacted with our invaluable resources, whether printed, digital or human.

The University Libraries are vital to the academic success of the University of Louisville community. Both on campus and online, we are a key resource, teaching students best practices in scholarly research and collaborating with faculty to support their pedagogy. Our rich resources promote academic success. Above all, we help make UofL great.

With an important place in the UofL framework, the Libraries invite students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors to revisit our facilities and interact with our resources, and our people.

The University Libraries support over 170 fields of study within 12 schools and colleges. Over three million people visit our libraries annually, and millions more access our website at http://www.louisville.edu/library. As members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the University of Louisville Libraries rank among the top 100 academic research libraries in North America.

Visit your University Library to learn more!


He swings, fans swoon: UofL library displays its renowned Tarzan collection

UofL Archives and Special Collections will display a portion of its enormous Edgar Rice Burroughs collection July 1, just in time for the release of the new “The Legend of Tarzan” film. Burroughs famously created the original Tarzan character and stories.

The Burroughs collection is the largest in the world, with more than 100,000 items such as first-edition books, fanzines, film stills, scrapbooks and posters, games and other memorabilia from the author’s life and works.

Known as “The Grandfather of American Science Fiction” Burroughs penned 63 novels, 21 short stories and 26 literary sketches. Originally writing for pulp magazines, Burroughs quickly mined a deep vein with his Tarzan character by capitalizing on the stories’ success by allowing merchandisers to create knives, bows and arrows, belt buckles, watches, figurines, candy, bread, pop-ups, coloring books and costumes. Many of these items are part of the collection.

Beginning July 1, to synchronize with the movie’s release, ASC will exhibit editions of “Tarzan” in 37 different languages, to emphasize the worldwide appeal of Burroughs’ iconic character. It will be on the first floor of Ekstrom Library, in the west wing across from the circulation desk, and run until Sept. 2, one day after Burroughs’ birthday.

“What better time to showcase some of this important collection, which means so much to the numerous fans of Burroughs, than at the release of another ‘Tarzan’ movie,” said Carrie Daniels, director of Archives and Special Collections. “Just the fact that this story, with an indelible character at the center, prompts a major movie release shows the longevity and imaginative depth of Burroughs’ original tale.”

Most of the collection was donated and curated by Archives and Special Collections Professor and Curator Emeritus George T. McWhorter, as a tribute to his mother, who taught him to read early in life using Burroughs’ stories. The collection is officially named in her honor.

In addition to the displayed exhibit, all items from the collection are available in Archives and Special Collections Research Room, Ekstrom Library, lower level 17. Anyone with a photo ID may view or research individual items 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

For more information, contact Daniels at 502-852-6676 or carrie.daniels@louisville.edu.